'twere

'twere

 (twûr)
Contraction of it were: "to hold as 'twere the mirror up to nature" (Shakespeare).

'twere

(twɜː; unstressed twə)
contraction of
it were

'twere

(twɜr; unstressed twər)
contraction of it were.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I ha been thinkin then, Rachael, that as 'tis but a day or two that remains, 'twere better for thee, my dear, not t' be seen wi' me.
LAZ[ARILLO] And 'twere the bare vineger 'tis eaten with, it would in some sort satisfie nature: but might I once attaine the dish it selfe, though I cut out my meanes through swords and fire, through poison, through any thing that may make good my hopes.
The purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature.
He is a man with many strings to his bow, as 'twere, including organist and tisticdirector of the Three Choirs Festival - covering classical treasures, dabblings in jazz, solo work and many organ gems.
I believe in its power to inform about the human condition, I believe in its power to heal, "to hold the mirror as 'twere up to nature," to the truths we uncover, to the truths we wrestle from uncertain and sometimes unyielding realities.
For such a one--not long ago I met full speed in rotten row And thought the thing was so uncommon I knew not if 'twere Man or Woman.
Prince Edward: But say, my lord, it were not registered, Methinks the truth should live from age to age, As 'twere retailed to all posterity Even to the general all-ending day.
Two sullen bullocks led the line, Their great eyes shining bright like wine; Two sullen captive kings were they, That had in time held herds at bay, And even now they crushed the sod With stolid sense of majesty And stately stepped and stately trod, As if 'twere something still to be Kings, even in captivity.
then 'twere well it were done quickly," said the fictional Macbeth.
A hundred dogs bay'd deep and strong, Clatter'd a hundred steeds along (Canto First, III: 1-6) (10) 'Twere long to tell what steeds gave o'er, As swept the hunt through Cambus-more; What reins were tighten'd in despair, When rose Benledi's ridge in air; Who flagg'd upon Bochastle's heath, Who shun'd to stem the flooded Teith,-- For twice that day, from shore to shore, The gallant stag swam stoutly o'er.
In his following words he touches on what Scotland really needs: "So that, I say, / He has borne all things well: and I do think / That had he Duncan's sons under his key--/ As, ant please heaven, he shall not--they should find / What 'twere to kill a father; so should Fleance" (16-20; italics mine).
27-28) that remorse, the swiftest of all wings, overtakes him in the moments of absolute clarity after the regicide: "To know my deed, 'twere best not know my self" (2.