ulama

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u·la·ma

 (o͞o′lə-mä′)
n.
Variant of ulema.

ulama

(ˈuːlɪmə) or

ulema

n
1. (Islam) a body of Muslim scholars or religious leaders
2. (Islam) a member of this body
[C17: from Arabic `ulamā scholars, from `alama to know]

ulama

(ˌuːˈlɑːmə)
n
(Team Sports, other than specified) a Meso-American team ball game, with a history dating back to as early as 1500 bc, played with a solid rubber ball on a long narrow court
[from Nahuatl Ullamalitztli ball game]

'u•la•ma

or u•le•ma

(ˈu ləˌmɑ)

n.pl.
the body of scholars who are authorities on Muslim religion and law.
[1680–90; < Arabic ‘ulamā learned men]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ulama - the body of Mullahs (Muslim scholars trained in Islam and Islamic law) who are the interpreters of Islam's sciences and doctrines and laws and the chief guarantors of continuity in the spiritual and intellectual history of the Islamic communityulama - the body of Mullahs (Muslim scholars trained in Islam and Islamic law) who are the interpreters of Islam's sciences and doctrines and laws and the chief guarantors of continuity in the spiritual and intellectual history of the Islamic community
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
Mollah, Mulla, Mullah - a Muslim trained in the doctrine and law of Islam; the head of a mosque
References in periodicals archive ?
Abu Zayd views the conflict between 'ulama and intellectuals as one emanating from an inability to keep the authorities of political institutions and religious institutions apart.
11) For a convincing argument that this has been the case, see Muhammad Qasim Zaman, "Pluralism, Democracy, and the 'Ulama,'" in Robert W.
This notion is borne out by the choice of a Shi'i high 'ulama as one of the three members of the Leadership for Iraqi National Congress, which is obviously supported by the US administration, the two other Leadership members being a Kurdish nationalist and a Sunni ex-military officer.
The direct motivation for establishing al-Da'wa was, however, the serious decline of the roles of the 'ulama (religious intellectuals) and hawza (academic circle) in the process of secularization of the judicial, education and social welfare systems within the modern state system.
One was a general trend of Islamic political movements not only among the 'ulama but also among laymen against secularization in the Middle East, regardless of sectarian differences.
9] Though al-Muzaffar was an 'ulama (mujtahid), his efforts can be recognized in the context of popularization of Islamic reform movements, when we see the reaction of the Shi'i religious establishment in Najaf toward Muntada, which "did not recognize the Muntada as a true madrasa" until Isfahani issued a fatwa for its recognition after several years.
Even though the Qur'an and Hadith do not explicitly discuss abortion, the 'ulama, or Islamic scholars, as well as the laity have traditionally rejected the kind of abortion which is at the heart of women's choice in the West and the United States.
Yet even here the similarity breaks down in so far as Ben Badis and the 'Ulama movement did not use coercion to achieve their aim, although they did mount scathing verbal attacks against sufi orders.
Increasingly, Algerian scholars who attempt to interpret the present crisis in the history of the nationalist movement, argue that from its inception, the Front of National Liberation included among its members a number of 'Ulama sympathisers who were excluded from government after independence.
But, Ephrat asks, "Did their [the madrasas'] appearance change the process by which individuals were recognized as scholars, gaining prominence among the 'ulama class?