French Revolution

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French Revolution

n
(Historical Terms) the anticlerical and republican revolution in France from 1789 until 1799, when Napoleon seized power
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.French Revolution - the revolution in France against the BourbonsFrench Revolution - the revolution in France against the Bourbons; 1789-1799
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Translations
Französische Revolution
Révolution française
References in periodicals archive ?
Bitcoin's mania evokes the Dutch tulip mania in Rembrandt's Amsterdam, the South Seas bubble in the eighteenth century that bankrupted Bourbon France and led to the 1789 revolution, the Roaring Twenties on Wall Street and dotcom mania in the late-1990s.
Contemporaries considered the return of the Bourbons to the French throne in 1814 a restoration not so much of that particular dynasty, says Sellin, but of the principle of divine right monarchy and a repudiation of the principle of popular sovereignty that had been the foundation of every regime since the 1789 revolution.
Fenby's narrative moves from the "lasting legacy" of the 1789 Revolution to mid-2016.
The reasons for this go back to the legacy of the 1789 revolution, and to the 19th-century philosopher Ernest Renan's definition of French citizenship as "a daily plebiscite", meaning the decision to live together and be equal.
They died as they lived: standing up for their principles, the principles the French first fought for in the 1789 Revolution.
We are a young nation lacking revolutionary precedents like France's 1789 Revolution and Britain's Cromwellian rout of royalty that bred the right into the individual to vote fearlessly according to their conscience and not simply follow party lines or apathetically abstain.
Historic examples of this dissipation of political will in sexual excess are the late Roman Empire, France just before its 1789 revolution, Germany in the 1920s.
Anti gay marriage activists dressed as Marianne, the symbol of the French republic since the 1789 revolution, make their point
I am writing an article as we speak, it's about Alexis de Tocqueville's 'The old Regime and the Revolution'," referring to the French thinker's analysis of the 1789 Revolution.
The couple's wedding was also hugely popular across the English Channel last year, with some French bemoaning the fact that they have not had a royal family of their own since the 1789 Revolution.