shot clock

(redirected from 24-second clock)

shot clock

n.
A timing device that is used in certain sports to indicate how many seconds remain for a team to take a shot before having to surrender possession of the ball.

shot′ clock`


n.
a clock used in basketball games to limit to a specific length the time taken between shots.
[1980–85]
References in periodicals archive ?
He blocked Rasho Nesterovic with 1:29 remaining in the fourth quarter, but O'Neal's thunderous dunk at the other end came just after the 24-second clock expired.
The offense is a little different because of the 24-second clock, but it's not much different from the John Wooden high-post offense.
The first one he took was late in the half to beat the 24-second clock.
Miami had another chance though when a 24-second clock violation on the subsequent Indiana possession gave them the ball back with the game on the line.
Barron made a lovely jump shot to beat the 24-second clock and Marcos Lopez fired in two threes but still the Stars led 51-38 at the end of the period.
After Allen missed a 3-pointer, Kendrick Perkins grabbed the rebound with 1:05 left, but the officials initially ruled that the ball hadn't hit the rim and the 24-second clock had expired.
Bryant almost didn't get that chance, dropping the ball off to Bynum in the post as the 24-second clock wound down.
I just told my guys, 'keep fighting, the game isn't over yet,'" said Howard, who caused an eight-minute delay in the first quarter by bringing down the 24-second clock with a vicious dunk.
The primary differences are a trapezoid-shaped key that is wider than they are used to at the baseline and a 24-second clock instead of the 35 seconds allowed in college basketball.
Zollner also was a strong advocate for several rule changes that shaped the game of basketball, including the 24-second clock, the six-foul rule and the widening of the free throw lane.
We are trying to use the new 24-second clock rule to our advantage.
The Basketball League claim the 24-second clock adds to the excitement of the game, but critics feel the 'run and gun' style of domestic basketball lacks discipline as players often rush to force off poor quality shots.