AAVE


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Related to AAVE: African American English, SAE

AAVE

abbr.
African American Vernacular English

AAVE

abbreviation for
(Languages) African-American Vernacular English
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.AAVE - a nonstandard form of American English characteristically spoken by African Americans in the United States
American English, American language, American - the English language as used in the United States
gangsta - (Black English) a member of a youth gang
References in periodicals archive ?
Using cultural ecological theory and social reproduction as theoretical frameworks, this study examines African American teachers' perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs toward AAVE and AAVE speakers, as well as the classroom practices teachers employ to support the learning of students who come to school with AAVE as their first language.
According to Winford, "It is evident to all linguists that AAVE and other varieties of New World Black English are legitimate, rule-governed systems of communication--true manifestations of the human faculty of language.
87) The data reveals a number of circumstances within AAVE in which some form of the copula appears regularly.
89) Labov develops explanation (3), and asks whether the omission of the copula in AAVE may track the regular rule for the contraction of the auxiliary in standard English.
Given these parallels between contraction and deletion, we are led to the conclusion that the absence of the copula in AAVE is due to a rule that is parallel and similar to the general auxiliary contraction rule of other dialects of English.
In the case of the missing copula in AAVE, we saw that the linguistic zero is defined in terms of the absence of structural material in a place where we--the speakers, presumably, of standard English--ordinarily expect there to be something.
asserting that the verb to be genuinely appears in the AAVE grammar, and is not a grammatical device that the speaker borrows from standard English as some linguists had previously assumed).
Holton analyzes the work of black writers like Amiri Baraka who experimented with AAVE in fiction.
Lewis has pointed out that African-American writers use AAVE to emphasize their political and social commentary.
In the opening sentence of "The Lesson," Bambara clearly indicates that Sylvia is narrating in AAVE.
Bambara fills this essay with sentence fragments, AAVE vocabulary, AAVE syntax, taboo words, and in-your-face confrontation of traditional methods of indoctrinating black students with standard English.