AAVE


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Related to AAVE: African American English, SAE

AAVE

abbr.
African American Vernacular English

AAVE

abbreviation for
(Languages) African-American Vernacular English
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.AAVE - a nonstandard form of American English characteristically spoken by African Americans in the United States
American English, American language, American - the English language as used in the United States
gangsta - (Black English) a member of a youth gang
References in periodicals archive ?
The study does not Imply that children should avoid learning AAVE, as the authors point out that it is a distinct dialect similar to variants like Cockney British and Appalachian American English, and advocate for efforts to eliminate discrimination against speakers of different vernaculars.
2% and indeed is pervasive in AAVE (Kortmann and Lunkenheimer 2011), this feature has not been recognized for Colloquial American English either.
Using cultural ecological theory and social reproduction as theoretical frameworks, this study examines African American teachers' perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs toward AAVE and AAVE speakers, as well as the classroom practices teachers employ to support the learning of students who come to school with AAVE as their first language.
The disappearance or weakening of the postvocalic r (non-rhoticism) used to be a shared feature in both vernaculars, but nowadays it is becoming more specific to AAVE.
William Labov's research on AAVE in schools provides evidence of how pupils who speak primarily in this non-standard dialect were performing well below average at the time of Stewart's publication, stating that in '1965, the black children of South Harlem were, on the average, two years behind grade level in reading' (Labov, 1995: 40) compared with the national average.
According to Winford, "It is evident to all linguists that AAVE and other varieties of New World Black English are legitimate, rule-governed systems of communication--true manifestations of the human faculty of language.
Within the United States, previous researchers have found that speakers with Spanish-influenced accents (Bradac & Wisegarver, 1984; Brennan & Brennan, 1981a, 1981b; De la Zerda & Hopper, 1979; Giles, Williams, Mackie, & Roselli, 1995; Rey, 1977; Ryan & Carranza, 1975), speakers of Appalachian English (Atkins, 1993; Luhman, 1990), and speakers of AAVE (Hopper, 1977; Hopper & Williams, 1973; Johnson & Buttny, 1982) were consistently given lower status ratings by American listeners.
The standard English "ear" expects "Himself has" but Dickinson uses a verb construction more common to African American Vernacular English (her familiarity with AAVE was in part due to having servants of African descent).
Coverage includes an overview of various perspectives documenting the emergence of AAVE; the functions, aspects, structures, and characteristics of AAVE from a sociolinguistic perspective; the effect of AAVE on written discourse and the influence of culture on written language produced by African American students at different educational levels; ways for classroom teachers to acknowledge the richness of AAVE; and the social and political implications of AAVE.
Middle-Class AAVE Versus Middle-Class Bilingualism: Contrasting Speech Communities.
are contrary to present-day convictions that AAVE has at least partially creole roots.
At issue for Labov is the absence of the verb to be in AAVE and "the search for the underlying grammar that produces this result.