ACE inhibitor

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ACE inhibitor

 (ās)
n.
Any of a class of drugs that cause vasodilation and are used to treat hypertension and heart failure.

[a(ngiotensin) c(onverting) e(nzyme) inhibitor.]

ACE inhibitor

n
(Pharmacology) any one of a class of drugs, including captopril, enalapril, and ramipril, that cause the arteries to widen by preventing the synthesis of angiotensin: used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure
[C20: from a(ngiotensin-)c(onverting) e(nzyme) inhibitor]

ACE′ inhib`itor

(eɪs, ˈeɪˈsiˈi)
n.
any of a group of vasodilator drugs used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure.
[1980–85; A(ngiotensin)-C(onverting) E(nzyme)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ACE inhibitor - an antihypertensive drug that blocks the formation of angiotensin II in the kidney, leading to relaxation of the arteriesACE inhibitor - an antihypertensive drug that blocks the formation of angiotensin II in the kidney, leading to relaxation of the arteries; promotes the excretion of salt and water by inhibiting the activity of the angiotensin converting enzyme; also used to treat congestive heart failure
antihypertensive, antihypertensive drug - a drug that reduces high blood pressure
Capoten, captopril - a drug (trade name Capoten) that blocks the formation of angiotensin in the kidneys resulting in vasodilation; used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure
enalapril, Vasotec - an ACE inhibitor (trade name Vasotec) that blocks the formation of angiotensin in the kidney and so results in vasodilation; administered after heart attacks
lisinopril, Prinival, Zestril - an ACE inhibiting drug (trade names Prinival or Zestril) administered as an antihypertensive and after heart attacks
Altace, ramipril - an ACE inhibitor (trade name Altace) used to treat high blood pressure or in some patients who have had a heart attack
Mavik, trandolapril - an ACE inhibiting drug (trade name Mavik) used in some patients after a heart attack or to treat hypertension
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in patients taking ACE inhibitors or ARBs for hypertension, increasing potassium intake must be approached with caution because of the potential for these drugs to cause hyperkalemia.
A 2011 meta-analysis of 5 RCTs (total 2975 patients) that compared ACE inhibitor therapy with placebo in diabetic patients without hypertension and albuminuria found that ACE inhibitors reduced the risk of new-onset microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria by 18% (relative risk [RR]=0.
Patients already taking ACE inhibitors for other conditions declined slightly more slowly in that time, while those new to the drugs improved.
Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) provide many of the same benefits of ACE inhibitors and may be an alternative for people who cannot tolerate ACE inhibitors.
The current trend is for use of ACE Inhibitors but ARBs are preferred due to cough though they can also produce cough.
ACE inhibitors ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors prevent the body from making ACE, which converts a naturally occurring chemical called angiotensin I into angiotensin II.
ACE inhibitors are among the most commonly prescribed medications worldwide because they are indicated in the management of hypertension, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic kidney disease.
In a literature review of diuretic medication, Roush, Kaur, and Ernst (2013) found evidence thiazide diuretics are as effective as beta blockers and ACE inhibitors in reducing cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed with HTN as well as stroke.
The risk of sudden death climbed by more than a third in older adults taking ACE inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) who were then put on the antibiotic medication cotrimoxazole (Bactrim .
Reviewed evidence suggests that ACE inhibitors or ARBs reduce the risk for end-stage renal disease and that there is no evidence that monitoring for proteinuria in patients on these medications improves outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
According to research, these drugs, known as ACE inhibitors, could even boost brain power.
If ACE inhibitors can be shown to be beneficial in both of these extremely common diseases, management would be considerably simplified, observed Dr.