ado

(redirected from ADOS)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

a·do

 (ə-do͞o′)
n.
Fuss; trouble; bother.

[Middle English, from the phrase at do : at, to (used with infinitive) (from Old Norse at; see ad- in Indo-European roots) + do, do; see do1.]

ado

(əˈduː)
n
bustling activity; fuss; bother; delay (esp in the phrases without more ado, with much ado)
[C14: from the phrase at do a to-do, from Old Norse at to (marking the infinitive) + do1]

ADO

abbreviation for
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) accumulated day off

a•do

(əˈdu)

n.
busy or delaying activity; bustle; fuss.
[1250–1300; Middle English (north) at do=at to (< Old Norse, which used at with the infinitive) + do do1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ado - a rapid active commotionado - a rapid active commotion    
ruckus, ruction, rumpus, commotion, din, tumult - the act of making a noisy disturbance

ado

noun fuss, to-do, trouble, delay, bother, stir, confusion, excitement, disturbance, bustle, flurry, agitation, commotion, pother And now, without further ado, let me introduce our benefactor.

ado

noun
Busy and useless activity:
Informal: to-do.
Translations

ado

[əˈduː] N without further or more adosin más (ni más)
much ado about nothingmucho ruido y pocas nueces

ado

[əˈduː] n
without further ado, without more ado → sans plus de cérémonie

ado

nAufheben nt, → Trara nt (inf); much ado about nothingviel Lärm um nichts; without more or further adoohne Weiteres

ado

[əˈduː] n without (any) more adosenza più indugi
References in periodicals archive ?
With more than 10 years experience in hospitality sales, Mirza Usman has been appointed as ADOS - corporate, and will be responsible for managing all existing and new corporate accounts.
All the ADOS will be bound to ensure 100 per cent attendance at schools besides working for new enrollments," the source said while taking about the new incentive.
ADOS scores should be interpreted in the context of an overall clinical assessment, because the test has a high sensitivity but a relatively low specificity, missing more than 50% of the children with diagnoses at 3 years.