abdicate

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ab·di·cate

 (ăb′dĭ-kāt′)
v. ab·di·cat·ed, ab·di·cat·ing, ab·di·cates
v.tr.
To relinquish (power or responsibility) formally.
v.intr.
To relinquish formally a high office or responsibility.

[Latin abdicāre, abdicāt-, to disclaim : ab-, away; see ab-1 + dicāre, to proclaim; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′di·ca·ble (-kə-bəl) adj.
ab′di·ca′tion n.
ab′di·ca′tor n.

abdicate

(ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt)
vb
to renounce (a throne, power, responsibility, rights, etc), esp formally
[C16: from the past participle of Latin abdicāre to proclaim away, disclaim]
abdicable adj
ˌabdiˈcation n
abdicative adj
ˈabdiˌcator n

ab•di•cate

(ˈæb dɪˌkeɪt)

v. -cat•ed, -cat•ing. v.t.
1. to give up or renounce (authority, duties, a high office, etc.), esp. in a voluntary, public, or formal manner.
v.i.
2. to renounce or relinquish a throne, office, right, power, claim, or responsibility, esp. in a formal manner.
[1535–45; < Latin abdicātus, past participle of abdicāre to renounce =ab- ab- + dicāre to indicate, consecrate (see dedicate)]
ab′di•ca•ble (-dɪ kə bəl) adj.
ab`di•ca′tion, n.
ab′di•ca`tive (-ˌkeɪ tɪv, -kə-) adj.
ab′di•ca`tor, n.

abdicate

- Implies a giving up of sovereign power or the evasion of responsibility (as a parent).
See also related terms for parent.

abdicate


Past participle: abdicated
Gerund: abdicating

Imperative
abdicate
abdicate
Present
I abdicate
you abdicate
he/she/it abdicates
we abdicate
you abdicate
they abdicate
Preterite
I abdicated
you abdicated
he/she/it abdicated
we abdicated
you abdicated
they abdicated
Present Continuous
I am abdicating
you are abdicating
he/she/it is abdicating
we are abdicating
you are abdicating
they are abdicating
Present Perfect
I have abdicated
you have abdicated
he/she/it has abdicated
we have abdicated
you have abdicated
they have abdicated
Past Continuous
I was abdicating
you were abdicating
he/she/it was abdicating
we were abdicating
you were abdicating
they were abdicating
Past Perfect
I had abdicated
you had abdicated
he/she/it had abdicated
we had abdicated
you had abdicated
they had abdicated
Future
I will abdicate
you will abdicate
he/she/it will abdicate
we will abdicate
you will abdicate
they will abdicate
Future Perfect
I will have abdicated
you will have abdicated
he/she/it will have abdicated
we will have abdicated
you will have abdicated
they will have abdicated
Future Continuous
I will be abdicating
you will be abdicating
he/she/it will be abdicating
we will be abdicating
you will be abdicating
they will be abdicating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been abdicating
you have been abdicating
he/she/it has been abdicating
we have been abdicating
you have been abdicating
they have been abdicating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been abdicating
you will have been abdicating
he/she/it will have been abdicating
we will have been abdicating
you will have been abdicating
they will have been abdicating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been abdicating
you had been abdicating
he/she/it had been abdicating
we had been abdicating
you had been abdicating
they had been abdicating
Conditional
I would abdicate
you would abdicate
he/she/it would abdicate
we would abdicate
you would abdicate
they would abdicate
Past Conditional
I would have abdicated
you would have abdicated
he/she/it would have abdicated
we would have abdicated
you would have abdicated
they would have abdicated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.abdicate - give up, such as power, as of monarchs and emperors, or duties and obligations; "The King abdicated when he married a divorcee"
resign, vacate, renounce, give up - leave (a job, post, or position) voluntarily; "She vacated the position when she got pregnant"; "The chairman resigned when he was found to have misappropriated funds"

abdicate

verb
1. resign, retire, quit, step down (informal) The last French king abdicated in 1848.
2. give up, yield, hand over, surrender, relinquish, renounce, waive, vacate, cede, abjure Edward chose to abdicate the throne, rather than give Mrs Simpson up.
3. renounce, give up, abandon, surrender, relinquish, waive, forgo, abnegate Many parents simply abdicate all responsibility for their children.

abdicate

verb
To give up a possession, claim, or right:
Translations
يَتَنَازَل عَن العَرْشيَتَنَازَل عَن المَسْؤُولِيَه، يَتَخَلّى
abdikovatvzdát se
abdicerefrasige sig tronengive fra sigoverlade
abdicirati
afsala sérsegja af sér
atsisakymasatsisakytiatsižadėti
atteikties
abdikovať
abdikeraavvisage upp
bırakmaktahttan çekilmek
từ bỏ

abdicate

[ˈæbdɪkeɪt]
A. VT
1. [+ throne] → abdicar
2. [+ responsibility, right] → renunciar a
B. VIabdicar (in favour of en, en favor de)

abdicate

[ˈæbdɪkeɪt]
vt
[king, queen, monarch] [+ throne] → abdiquer
to abdicate responsibility for sb/sth → démissionner de ses responsabilités vis-à-vis de qn/qch, démissionner vis-à-vis de qn/qch
vi [king, queen, monarch] → abdiquer

abdicate

vtverzichten auf (+acc)
vi (monarch)abdanken, abdizieren (dated geh); (pope)zurücktreten

abdicate

[ˈæbdɪkeɪt]
1. viabdicare
2. vt (throne) → abdicare a; (responsibility) → rinunciare a

abdicate

(ˈӕbdikeit) verb
1. to leave or give up the position and authority of a king or queen. The king abdicated (the throne) in favour of his son.
2. to leave or give up (responsibility, power etc). He abdicated all responsibility for the work to his elder son.
ˌabdiˈcation noun
References in classic literature ?
What is proposed to me would be, in fact, almost an abdication, and an abdication requires reflection.
There was in this voluntary abdication of his freewill, in this fancy submitting itself to another fancy, which suspects it not, a mixture of fantastic independence and blind obedience, something indescribable, intermediate between slavery and liberty, which pleased Gringoire,--a spirit essentially compound, undecided, and complex, holding the extremities of all extremes, incessantly suspended between all human propensities, and neutralizing one by the other.
Les ordonnances = four decrees establishing absolute rule, issued by King Charles X on July 25, 1830, which touched off the July Revolution, leading to his abdication on July 31, and the installation of the Duke of Orleans as Louis Philippe I, King of the French--Cooper was living in Paris during this period, though he returned there from Italy and Germany a few days after the July Revolution itself, and he was a close friend of the Marquis de Lafayette who played a major part in the Revolution and its aftermath; for Cooper and many others, the ultimate results of the Revolution were a serious disappointment, since the new King seemed rapidly to become almost as conservative as the old}
Richard inherited after the death of his father, and England at the abdication of Richard.