abomination

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a·bom·i·na·tion

 (ə-bŏm′ə-nā′shən)
n.
1. Abhorrence; disgust.
2. A cause of abhorrence or disgust.

abomination

(əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃən)
n
1. a person or thing that is disgusting
2. an action that is vicious, vile, etc
3. intense loathing

a•bom•i•na•tion

(əˌbɒm əˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
1. something greatly disliked or abhorred.
2. intense aversion or loathing; detestation.
3. a vile or shameful action, condition, or habit.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abomination - a person who is loathsome or disgustingabomination - a person who is loathsome or disgusting
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.abomination - hate coupled with disgustabomination - hate coupled with disgust    
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
3.abomination - an action that is vicious or vileabomination - an action that is vicious or vile; an action that arouses disgust or abhorrence; "his treatment of the children is an abomination"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"

abomination

abomination

noun
Translations
شَيءٌ بَغيضْ
hnusodporodpornostohavnostzhnusení
modbydelighedvederstyggelighed
viîbjóîur
hnusodpor
iğrenmetiksinti

abomination

[əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃən] N
1. (= feeling) → aversión f
2. (= detestable act, thing) → escándalo m

abomination

[əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃən] n
(= outrage) → abomination f
(= hatred) → abomination f

abomination

n
no plVerabscheuung f; to be held in abomination by somebodyvon jdm verabscheut werden
(= loathsome act)Abscheulichkeit f; (= loathsome thing)Scheußlichkeit f

abomination

[əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃn] n (feeling) → avversione f, disgusto; (detestable act, thing) → azione f (or cosa) orrenda
to hold sth in abomination → detestare qc

abominate

(əˈbomineit) verb
to detest. He abominates cruelty.
aˌbomiˈnation noun
References in classic literature ?
I do not ask you to be loyal, Erskine; but I expect you, in common humanity, to sympathize with the chief figure in the pageant, who is no more accountable for the manifold evils and abominations that exist in his realm than the Lord Mayor is accountable for the thefts of the pickpockets who follow his show on the ninth of November.
Though it was faint and low, it moved me more profoundly than all that I had hitherto heard of the abominations behind the wall.
As I thought of that, I was almost moved to begin a massacre of the helpless abominations about me, but I contained myself.
But the figure which most attracted the public eye, and stirred up the deepest feeling, was the Episcopal clergyman of King's Chapel, riding haughtily among the magistrates in his priestly vestments, the fitting representatives of prelacy and persecution, the union of church and state, and all those abominations which had driven the Puritans to the wilderness.
The abominations of Paganism have given way to the pure rites of the Christian worship,--the ignorant savage has been supplanted by the refined European
The light proceeding from one of these gaudy abominations is unequal broken, and painful.
What her answer really said was: "If you lift a finger you'll drive me back: back to all the abominations you know of, and all the temptations you half guess.
I only brought them to try, for Rose is growing stout, and will have no figure if it is not attended to soon," she added, with an air of calm conviction that roused the Doctor still more, for this was one of his especial abominations.
Judaea now and all the Promised Land, Reduced a province under Roman yoke, Obeys Tiberius, nor is always ruled With temperate sway: oft have they violated The Temple, oft the Law, with foul affronts, Abominations rather, as did once Antiochus.
He knew it existed, as we know that crime and abominations exist; he had heard of it as a peaceable citizen in a town hears of battles, famines, and floods, and yet knows nothing of what these things mean -- though, indeed, he may have been mixed up in a street row, have gone without his dinner once, or been soaked to the skin in a shower.
Ay, that is partly true, too, I fear; and it will not be long before an accursed band of choppers and loggers will be following on their heels, to humble the wilderness which lies so broad and rich on the western banks of the Mississippi, and then the land will be a peopled desert, from the shores of the main sea to the foot of the Rocky Mountains; fill'd with all the abominations and craft of man, and stript of the comforts and loveliness it received from the hands of the Lord
And, beneath the show of a marble palace, that pool of stagnant water, foul with many impurities, and, perhaps, tinged with blood,--that secret abomination, above which, possibly, he may say his prayers, without remembering it,--is this man's miserable soul!