absence seizure

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absence seizure

n.
A generalized seizure marked by transient loss of consciousness and the absence of convulsions, occurring mostly in children. Also called petit mal seizure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absence seizure - the occurrence of an abrupt, transient loss or impairment of consciousness (which is not subsequently remembered), sometimes with light twitching, fluttering eyelids, etc.absence seizure - the occurrence of an abrupt, transient loss or impairment of consciousness (which is not subsequently remembered), sometimes with light twitching, fluttering eyelids, etc.; common in petit mal epilepsy
ictus, raptus, seizure - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a disease; "he suffered an epileptic seizure"
epilepsia minor, petit mal, petit mal epilepsy - epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal attacks of brief clouding of consciousness (and possibly other abnormalities); "she has been suffering from petit mal since childhood"
complex absence - an absence seizure accompanied by other abnormalities (atonia or automatisms or vasomotor changes)
pure absence, simple absence - an absence seizure without other complications; followed by 3-per-sec brainwave spikes
subclinical absence - a transient impairment of cortical function demonstrable only by 3-per-second brainwave spikes
References in periodicals archive ?
The seizures can either be of the tonic-clonic type or of other types that do not involve muscle contractions such as absence seizures or complex partial seizures1.
Most common seizure type was generalised tonic clonic seizures (68%) followed by simple partial seizures (12%), complex partial seizure (10%), myoclonic seizures (5%) and absence seizures (4%).
MES and PTZ tests are the best-validated method for assessment of AED in human generalized tonic--clonic seizures and absence seizures, respectively, among the tests used for evaluation of anticonvulsant activity.
The primary characteristics of CAE are the very frequent absence seizures (Jallon & Latour, 2005).
Their nine-year-old son, Bradley, suffers with epilepsy, causing him to have absence seizures, which can kill him.
Approximately, 85% of patients are known to develop GTCSs several months or years after the onset, while 10%-15% of these patients develop absence seizures.
He also has hypermobility, and has leg braces to hold his ankle and knee joints in place and strengthen his muscles, as well as suffering absence seizures where he loses awareness of his surroundings.
showed that enhancing the glutamate activity of parafascicular nucleus could significantly suppress the paroxysmal discharges in rats with generalized absence seizures [50].
A case of atypical absence seizures induced by leuprolide acetate.
Contrastingly, some seizures are produced immediately after awakening (awakening seizures), including short-lasting myoclonus with secondary generalization (tonic-clonic seizures), generalized clonic seizures and, albeit infrequent, absence seizures (PELED; LAVE, 1986).
Her epilepsy is now managed with medication but remains as petit mal, a complaint that means she suffers from short absence seizures.
As a specific electroclinical syndrome, it is characterized by a genetic predisposition, no evidence of neurological or intellectual deficit and by mandatory or typical myoclonic seizures alone (irregular jerks of the shoulders and arms) or combined with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) in 80% or the absence seizures in 15-30%.