absolutism

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ab·so·lut·ism

 (ăb′sə-lo͞o′tĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A political theory holding that all power should be vested in one ruler or other authority.
b. A form of government in which all power is vested in a single ruler or other authority.
2. An absolute doctrine, principle, or standard.

ab′so·lut′ist n.
ab′so·lu·tis′tic (-lo͞o-tĭs′tĭk) adj.

absolutism

(ˈæbsəluːˌtɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of a political system in which unrestricted power is vested in a monarch, dictator, etc; despotism
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. any theory which holds that truth or moral or aesthetic value is absolute and universal and not relative to individual or social differences. Compare relativism
b. the doctrine that reality is unitary and unchanging and that change and diversity are mere illusion. See also monism2, pluralism5b
3. (Theology) Christianity an uncompromising form of the doctrine of predestination
ˈabsoˌlutist n, adj

ab•so•lut•ism

(ˈæb sə luˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or the exercise of unrestricted power in government.
2. any theory holding that values, principles, etc., are absolute and not relative, dependent, or changeable.
[1745–55]
ab′so•lut`ist, n., adj.
ab`so•lu•tis′tic, adj.

absolutism

the theory and exercise of complete and unrestricted power in government. See also autarchy, autocracy, despotism, dictatorship, monarchy, oligarchy. — absolutist, n., adj.absolutistic. adj.
See also: Government

absolutism

A political theory that all power should be in the hands of a single ruler.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolutism - dominance through threat of punishment and violenceabsolutism - dominance through threat of punishment and violence
ascendance, ascendancy, ascendence, ascendency, dominance, control - the state that exists when one person or group has power over another; "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"
2.absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
3.absolutism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in governmentabsolutism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in government
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
4.absolutism - the doctrine of an absolute beingabsolutism - the doctrine of an absolute being  
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school

absolutism

noun dictatorship, tyranny, totalitarianism, authoritarianism, despotism, autocracy, arbitrariness, absolute rule, absoluteness, autarchy the triumphal reassertion of royal absolutism

absolutism

noun
1. A political doctrine advocating the principle of absolute rule:
2. A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
Translations
apsolutizam
absolutismeenevelde

absolutism

[ˈæbsəluːtɪzəm] Nabsolutismo m

absolutism

[ˌæbsəˈluːtɪzəm] n
(political system)absolutisme m
(absolutist way of thinking)absolutisme m

absolutism

nAbsolutismus m

absolutism

[ˈæbsəluːˌtɪzm] n (Pol) → assolutismo
References in classic literature ?
this paragraph refers to controversies, before the French "July Revolution" of 1830, between rightist ("cote droit" = right side) legitimists, who read the official "Moniteur" newspaper and supported the absolutist Bourbon monarchy of King Charles X, and leftist ("cote gauche" = left side) liberals, who read "Le Temps" and argued for reform or revolution; "nothing good could come of Nazareth" = from the Bible, John, I, 46: "Can any good thing come out of Nazareth"}
She had not only felt him to be inoffensive, but she had said so, which last by a confusion of her absolutist mind became a sort of incontrovertible demonstration.
The degradation of servitude, the absolutist lies must be uprooted and swept out.
The absolutists, who uphold every item of doctrine and teaching is unchangeable, will resort to their last line of defense, invoking the "domino effect" that will lead to dismantling the church's foundations.
From market absolutists, conservative economists, and others, what one hears is an endless mantra about the wonders of free markets and globalization: low taxes, no regulation, and free markets lead to investment, increased trade, GDP growth, opportunity, rising incomes, and prosperity.
I especially liked the quick-reference rundown on which authors are moral absolutists and which are relativists, as well as the reasons why; the pros and cons of each book, author, and premise; and, most importantly, why that book (or another by the same author) is relevant for warriors.
The absolutists on both sides are already mustering their forces to shut down the debate before it gets going.
Yet it should be obvious, to all but dogmatic First Amendment absolutists, that people forced to live in an increasingly brutalized culture are, in a very real sense, not wholly free.
The Patriot Act absolutists, in arguing for a blanket removal of the sunsets, basically make one substantive argument.
These two factors are inviolable for absolutists vis-a-vis making moral judgments.
Canadian courts, usually so keen on fine points of nuanced distinction (that is their "high-level, specialized, intellectual work" that Chief Justice McLachlin recently praised) are absolutists when it comes to equality claims.
Family practitioners and absolutists were significantly more supportive of religious activities and had more religious parents than psychiatrists and relativists.