esotropia

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es·o·tro·pi·a

 (ĕs′ə-trō′pē-ə)
n.
A form of strabismus in which one or both of the eyes deviate inward. Also called crossed eyes, cross-eye.

[New Latin esōtropia : Greek esō, within; see en in Indo-European roots + Greek tropē, a turning; see -tropic.]

es′o·trop′ic (-trŏp′ĭk, -trō′pĭk) adj.

esotropia

(ˌɛsəˈtrəʊpɪə)
n
a condition in which the eye or eyes turn inwards

esotropia

a condition of the eyes in which while one eye focuses on the object viewed the other eye turns inward; cross-eye.
See also: Eyes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.esotropia - strabismus in which one or both eyes turn inward toward the noseesotropia - strabismus in which one or both eyes turn inward toward the nose
squint, strabismus - abnormal alignment of one or both eyes
Translations

es·o·tro·pi·a

n. esotropia. V.: esophoria
References in periodicals archive ?
Optometrists will also see accommodation issues in young children, particularly in cases such as accommodative esotropia, which is the most common cause of strabismus in children.
Accommodative esotropia, myopia, strabismus, and blepharitis are common ophthalmologic conditions associated with DS, (1) as is the rarer keratoconus, or anterior bulging of the cornea.
Objective: To determine the prognostic factors affecting stereoacuity in patients with refractive accommodative esotropia (RAE) according to the results of long follow- up period.
Spasm of the near reflex mimicking deteriorating accommodative esotropia.
Some children have accommodative esotropia, characterized by farsightedness and concomitant overfocusing, which results in overconvergence and crossed eyes.
Case 1--decompensated alternating fully accommodative esotropia
Refractive correction for accommodative esotropia and/or surgical alignment of the eyes in these cases can reduce nystagmus intensity, convert manifest-latent nystagmus to latent-latent nystagmus and improve binocular VA.
As yet, there is no known inheritance pattern for concomitant strabismus, and while accommodative esotropia seems to have a stronger genetic link than other types of concomitant strabismus, it is possible that the individual may inherit the risk factor (high hyperopia) rather than a single gene.