Achaea

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A·chae·a

 (ə-kē′ə) also A·cha·ia (ə-kī′ə, -kā′-)
An ancient region of southern Greece occupying the northern part of the Peloponnesus on the Gulf of Corinth. The cities of the region banded together in the early third century bc to form the Achaean League, which defeated Sparta but was eventually beaten by the Romans, who annexed Achaea in 146 bc and later gave the name to a province that included all of Greece south of Thessaly.

Achaea

(əˈkiːə) or

Achaia

n
1. (Placename) a department of Greece, in the N Peloponnese. Capital: Patras. Pop: 318 928 (2001). Area: 3209 sq km (1239 sq miles). Modern Greek name: Akhaïa
2. (Placename) a province of ancient Greece, in the N Peloponnese on the Gulf of Corinth: enlarged as a Roman province in 27 bc

A•chae•a

(əˈki ə)

n.
an ancient district in S Greece, on the Gulf of Corinth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Achaea - a region of ancient Greece on the north coast of the Peloponnese
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
References in classic literature ?
Ulysses and I were in the house, inside, and heard all that he said to you; for we came to the fair house of Peleus while beating up recruits throughout all Achaea, and when we got there we found Menoetius and yourself, and Achilles with you.
Hesiod says that she was seduced by Hippostratus the son of Amarynces and that her father Hipponous sent her from Olenus in Achaea to Oeneus because he was far away from Hellas, bidding him kill her.