acrostic

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acrostic

a·cros·tic

 (ə-krô′stĭk, ə-krŏs′tĭk)
n.
1. A poem or series of lines in which certain letters, usually the first in each line, form a name, motto, or message when read in sequence.
3. A word puzzle in which the answers to several different clues form an anagram of a quotation, phrase, or other text.

[French acrostiche, from Old French, from Greek akrostikhis : akron, head, end; see acromegaly + stikhos, line; see steigh- in Indo-European roots.]

a·cros′tic adj.

acrostic

(əˈkrɒstɪk)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms)
a. a number of lines of writing, such as a poem, certain letters of which form a word, proverb, etc. A single acrostic is formed by the initial letters of the lines, a double acrostic by the initial and final letters, and a triple acrostic by the initial, middle, and final letters
b. the word, proverb, etc, so formed
c. (as modifier): an acrostic sonnet.
[C16: via French from Greek akrostikhis, from acro- + stikhos line of verse, stich]
aˈcrostically adv

a•cros•tic

(əˈkrɔ stɪk, əˈkrɒs tɪk)

n.
1. a series of written lines or verses in which the first, last, or other particular letters form a word, phrase, etc.
adj.
2. Also, a•cros′ti•cal. of, like, or forming an acrostic.
[1580–90; < Greek akrostichís=akro- acro- + stích(os) stich + -is n. suffix]
a•cros′ti•cal•ly, adv.

acrostic

- From Greek akron, "end," and stikhos, "row, line of verse."
See also related terms for row.

acrostic

A verse in which the initial letters of each line form a word or phrase reading downwards.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acrostic - a puzzle where you fill a square grid with words reading the same down as acrossacrostic - a puzzle where you fill a square grid with words reading the same down as across
mystifier, puzzle, puzzler, teaser - a particularly baffling problem that is said to have a correct solution; "he loved to solve chessmate puzzles"; "that's a real puzzler"
2.acrostic - verse in which certain letters such as the first in each line form a word or message
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
Translations
Akrostichon

acrostic

[əˈkrɒstɪk] Nacróstico m

acrostic

nAkrostichon nt
References in classic literature ?
When this method fails, they have two others more effectual, which the learned among them call acrostics and anagrams.
Mr Slum then withdrew to alter the acrostic, after taking a most affectionate leave of his patroness, and promising to return, as soon as he possibly could, with a fair copy for the printer.
I had an acrostic once sent to me upon my own name, which I was not at all pleased with.
A character is like an acrostic or Alexandrian stanza;--read it forward, backward, or across, it still spells the same thing.
95, PB, 70pp) comprised of 50 favorite acrostics that reveal wise and witty sayings on lessons learned, enjoying life, and the value of experience, crossword enthusiasts will enjoy cracking the clues in the word column; transferring them to the diagram; and discovering quotations from people like Dave Barry, Lord Byron, Willa Cather, Pat Conroy, Gloria Steinem, and more.
We have reason to believe the witness is a fan of acrostics.
Her mastery extends to her use of varied poetic forms, including acrostics, which incorporate lines from some of Frost's favorite poems.
Additional resources such as books and web sites are also included in this fun acrostics poem definition and how to manual.
Acrostics are a revelatory form that consistently reveal what they purport to conceal, such as the poet's name or the alphabet.
Among the topics are early 15th-century acrostics in the Cistercian codex from Rudy, the Judas the Traitor epigrammatic cycle and Jacob Masen's theory of the Argutia sources, Pomeranian poets about their dead rulers: elaborate forms in 17th-century funeral poetry, pattern heraldic forms in Old Polish literature, the theory of poesis artificiosa in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania 1660-1760, and ars combinatoria as a poetics on the presence of combinatorial structures in the late-Baroque artificial poetry.
Editorial note: "Twigworth Yews" is one in a new series of acrostics.
In this sinister fading metropolis we meet one Sven Norberg, a man of little consequence; he narrates his inept search for his wife, Molly, the town's prize opera star, who never returned home from a rehearsal one evening, and yet is rumored (in acrostics in newspaper columns) to still be singing, somewhere.