active galactic nucleus

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Related to Active galactic nuclei: quasar

active galactic nucleus

n.
A galactic nucleus that emits more radiation than can be accounted for solely by light from the stars it contains.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seyfert's classic paper, read at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society, launched the close attention being paid today to active galactic nuclei or AGNs.
We used black hole mass as a proxy for the energy put into the galaxy by the AGN, because accretion onto more massive black holes leads to more energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei, which would quench star formation faster," MartAaAaAeA n-Navarro explaine
hydro models of galaxy formation, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic rays.
Objective: "Some of the most important open questions in astrophysics concern how and when active galactic nuclei (AGN) are triggered, and how important they are in the evolution of galaxies.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Active galactic nuclei are the brightest objects in the universe.
SMBHs are responsible for one of the most energetic phenomena in the universe, called Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs).
At a distance of only 13 million light-years, the Circinus Galaxy contains one of the closest and brightest active galactic nuclei.
The 61 papers look at low-z mergers and starbursts, merger dynamics and simulations, mergers in galaxy evolution, merging and active galactic nuclei, high redshift merging and sub-millimeter galaxies, active galactic nuclei/starburst feedbacks, chemical evolution, and results from new surveys.
The observations, reported online September 27 in Science, may help explain how some active galactic nuclei launch powerful plasma jets thousands of light-years into space.
Peter Barthel, who studies quasars and active galactic nuclei at the Kapteyn Astronomical Institute at the University of Groningen, also claims scenes of penguins cavorting with polar bears, "corrupt nature".
Speakers included the Director, who gave a review of the year and then showed a selection of images from the Section archive, David Aditti on using the f/2 Hyperstar system, Owen Brazell on observing galaxy clusters, Nick Hewitt on active galactic nuclei and Geoffrey Johnstone on astrophotography in the 1980s.
He also worked with Dr Floyd Steckerof NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and they were the first to predict the cosmic horizon for very high energy gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei with relative accuracy.