participle

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Related to Active participle: Future participle, Passive participle

participle

Participles are words formed from verbs that can function as adjectives or gerunds or can be used to form the continuous tenses and the perfect tenses of verbs. There are two participle forms: the present participle and the past participle.
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par·ti·ci·ple

 (pär′tĭ-sĭp′əl)
n.
A form of a verb that in some languages, such as English, can function independently as an adjective, as the past participle baked in We had some baked beans, and is used with an auxiliary verb to indicate tense, aspect, or voice, as the past participle baked in the passive sentence The beans were baked too long.

[Middle English, from Old French, variant of participe, from Latin participium (translation of Greek metokhē, sharing, partaking, participle), from particeps, particip-, partaker; see participate.]
Usage Note: Participial phrases such as walking down the street or having finished her homework are commonly used in English to modify nouns or pronouns, but care must be taken in incorporating such phrases into sentences. Readers will ordinarily associate a participle with the noun, noun phrase, or pronoun adjacent to it, and misplacement may produce comic effects as in He watched his horse take a turn around the track carrying a racing sheet under his arm. A correctly placed participial phrase leaves no doubt about what is being modified: Sitting at her desk, Jane read the letter carefully. · Another pitfall in using participial phrases is illustrated in the following sentence: Turning the corner, the view was quite different. Grammarians would say that such a sentence contains a "dangling participle" because there is no noun or pronoun in the sentence that the participial phrase can logically modify. Moving the phrase will not solve the problem (as it would in the sentence about the horse with a racing sheet). To avoid distracting the reader, it would be better to recast the sentence as When we turned the corner, the view was quite different or Turning the corner, we had a different view. · A number of expressions originally derived from participles have become prepositions, and these may be used to introduce phrases that are not associated with the immediately adjacent noun phrase. Such expressions include concerning, considering, failing, granting, judging by, and speaking of. Thus one may write without fear of criticism Speaking of politics, the elections have been postponed or Considering the hour, it is surprising that he arrived at all. See Note at very.

participle

(ˈpɑːtɪsɪpəl; pɑːˈtɪsɪpəl)
n
(Grammar) a nonfinite form of verbs, in English and other languages, used adjectivally and in the formation of certain compound tenses. See also present participle, past participle
[C14: via Old French from Latin participium, from particeps partaker, from pars part + capere to take]
participial adj, n
ˌpartiˈcipially adv

par•ti•ci•ple

(ˈpɑr təˌsɪp əl, -sə pəl)

n.
a nonfinite verbal form that can function as an adjective or be used with certain auxiliaries to make compound verb forms, as burning in a burning candle or devoted in your devoted friend. Abbr.: part. Compare past participle, present participle.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French, variant of participe < Latin participium, derivative (with -ium -ium1) of particeps taking part =parti- (s. of pars) part + -cep- (comb. form of capere to take) + -s nominative singular ending]
usage: See dangling participle, misplaced modifier.

participle

A form of a verb that can also function as an adjective, such as “cooked” or “pressing.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.participle - a non-finite form of the verb; in English it is used adjectivally and to form compound tenses
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
present participle - a participle expressing present action; in English is formed by adding -ing
past participle, perfect participle - a participle that expresses completed action
Translations
příčestí
partisiippi
particip
melléknévi igenév
lýsingarháttur
分詞
partisipp
deležnik
particip

participle

[ˈpɑːtɪsɪpl] Nparticipio m
past participleparticipio m pasado or pasivo
present participleparticipio m activo or (de) presente

participle

[ˈpɑːrtɪsɪpəl] nparticipe m

participle

nPartizip nt ? present, past

participle

[pɑːˈtɪsɪpl] nparticipio
past/present participle → participio passato/presente

participle

(ˈpaːˈtisipl) noun
word formed from a verb, used either to form compound tenses or as an adjective or noun. ('going' and 'gone' are the present and past participle of 'go'.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The form is either an active perfect "he called" or an active participle "calling/the one who calls," not a passive as in Tsedaka's translation.
The word yoledet is an active participle and can be translated "is bearing/giving birth to.
A most interesting feature which caught my attention is the fact that the editor systematically adapted the future active participle in the future active infinitive to its subject (34/21, p.
The l-participle is an active participle, which means that it presents the energy having left the source domain.
Likewise, for its positive usage, the Mu'jam states that the word abadan is used in the Qur'an twelve times with an active participle (ism al-fa'il) in the mansub state and twice with a verb.
He might just as well have argued that the Qal active participle used in the following phrase, he "spreads out the earth," means the Bible is saying that the spreading out of the earth is "continual and ongoing.
The marker -vat in the contemporary standard language consists diachronically of two elements: the marker -v(a) of the present active participle and the partitive ending -t.
Aronoff convincingly shows that the stem in the third column of Table 2 is multifunctional since, in addition to the perfect passive participle, it is used to realize other unrelated categories, namely future active participle and supine, as well as a number of derivational categories, for example agentives and abstracts.
If druncne were an active participle, 'having drunk' (a possibility which will be discussed further below), its object in line 480 would be in the accusative case (beor), and not in the dative (beore).
The Latin active participle, being syntactically multifunctional licenses the author of Old English equivalents to use a grammatical structure which 15 closest semantically in his language, provided he has a good knowledge of Latin, which I assume, is the case with Aldred.
Eastern Arabian dialects of former South Yemen, Oman, the Emirates, and Bahrain; those of eastern Syria, Khorasan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan; and Bagirmi Arabic in northeast Nigeria, Cameroon, and western Chad--an intrusive -n is added onto the active participle only before an object suffix.
There are (at least) two types of adjectival stems which only derive SSNs: those of adjectival (usually result-oriented) passive participles, and those of adjectival active participle forms.