Adamite

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Adamite

(ˈædəˌmaɪt)
n
1. a human being
2. a nudist, esp a member of an early Christian sect who sought to imitate Adam
Adamitic adj
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The features of the surrounding picture were, a church with hoarding and scaffolding about it, which had been under suppositious repair so long that the means of repair looked a hundred years old, and had themselves fallen into decay; a quantity of washed linen, spread to dry in the sun; a number of houses at odds with one another and grotesquely out of the perpendicular, like rotten pre- Adamite cheeses cut into fantastic shapes and full of mites; and a feverish bewilderment of windows, with their lattice-blinds all hanging askew, and something draggled and dirty dangling out of most of them.
should have appear first, appears first appeared first, lighter skins since humans darker skin of Adamites evolved in the after Noah.
But our religious history could have been very different if we'd ever been visited by the Adamites, a group of early Christian nudists who believed that every act of sex was a profound prayer.
At the end of the first, the Adamites burnt their libraries before joining their brethren in preparation for the Apocalypse, so as not to carry useless wisdom into the promised Kingdom of Heaven.
Not willing to live in the monastic spirit, whose "rule was the work of Antichrist,"(56) the Adamites called for the communal sharing of women.
Instead of thinking in terms of regression from a golden to an iron age, the narrator proposes we think of paradise as the present in which we live, since any speculation of the no-longer or the not-yet destroys the enjoyment of the here and now, where the Middle Ages placed the sensual pleasures of the Adamites and modern restaurants serve up "Paradise chops.
In this context, Alexander Winchell's Adamites and Preadamites (1878) provides a theological North Star by which others might navigate a path that harmonizes the natural sciences and the Bible.
He assumes that only Adam and Eve were created "in God's image," and only Adamites were "capable of achieving God's kingdom," whereas non-Adamites only obtain this accountability through hearing the biblical message, and their participation in God's image depends on faith in the Messiah.
That book, Adamites and Pre-Adamites, was published in 1878, yet Winchell had come out as a proponent of evolution nearly four years earlier, when he published a book called The Doctrine of Evolution.
According to this theory, Eve gave birth to one son fathered by Adam, whose progeny became known as Adamites, or the "white race.
In contrast, several paragraphs in the conclusion are devoted to straw-horse targets, such as Wilhelm Fraenger's 1947 proposition that the Garden of Earthly Delights was produced for a sect of Adamites or freethinkers who supposedly favored nudism.
Similarly, the depravity of Adamite nudity was intimately linked with the equally depraved presumption of speaking a pure, Edenic language.