adiaphorism

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adiaphorism

(ˌædɪˈæfəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Theology) a Christian Protestant theological theory that certain rites and actions are matters of indifference in religion since not forbidden by the Scriptures
[C19: see adiaphorous]
ˌadiˈaphorist n
ˌadiˌaphoˈristic adj

adiaphorism

a tolerance of conduct or beliefs not specifically forbidden in the Scriptures. Cf. Flacianism, Philippism. — adiaphorist, n. — adiaphoristic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
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This is not adiaphora, and that is why the "young, restless, and reformed" have identified complementarianism as a decisive factor in their theological priorities.
Jacqueline Rose's essay on adiaphora (matters indifferent to worship) and debates over authority sheds light on aspects related to tolerationism and religious coexistence that are often overlooked.
Several New Testament texts deal with it, and Christians--at least Paul's ideal Christians--ultimately championed the view that circumcision was among the adiaphora for Gentiles: it made "no difference.
Indeed, the reformer not only expounds upon the necessity of human delight in the goodness of God, (39) but also offers extended reflection on the freedom of human conscience from things adiaphora, things "indifferent," that bear no relation to the soul or its salvation.
9) Lutherans, on the other hand, could find no scriptural warrant for the rite of confirmation, so it was quickly relegated to the category of adiaphora.
The strong sense of adiaphora, which Braaten does apply to certain well-considered conclusions, is allowed no place in relation to the litmus test issues to which he reacts so strongly.
77) Sebastian CONTRERAS, Adiaphora e indeterminacion en el derecho, en Pensamiento, 65 (2012), pp.
Theirs was not a personal quarrel leading to distinction through organization, with religious differences trailing behind as so much adiaphora.
Participants called for an evaluation and development of criteria to identify those doctrinal issues that constitute adiaphora, or elements that are not essential to the basic core identity of what it means to be Christian and the church of Jesus Christ.
The late Bishop of Bangor and Liberal churchman Tony Crockett used the word adiaphora to denote this issue.
Perhaps even a transparent doctrine of adiaphora, or "things different"?
His nearly cheerful treatment of the issue as indifferent, as adiaphora, sounds methodologically close to Erasmus in the early sixteenth century, who, while uncertain as to the apostolic validity of the doctrine, diplomatically accepted the literal descent, telling his catechumen to treat the notion as a matter of "pious human reflections" rather than an article of faith.