admissions


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admissions

(ædˈmɪʃənz)
pl n
1. (Education)
a. the procedure for admitting students to study at a college, university, or school
b. (as modifier): an admissions policy.
2. (Education) (as modifier): an admissions policy.
3. (Education) the students admitted to an institution
References in classic literature ?
Are all our former admissions which were made within a few days to be thrown away?
The horrible conclusion has almost always been derived from the second-hand evidence of Europeans, or else from the admissions of the savages themselves, after they have in some degree become civilized.
Guppy, going with one leg and staying with the other, "but this lady being present--your own witness--it might be a satisfaction to your mind (which I should wish to set at rest) if you was to repeat those admissions.
Of course he contradicted himself twenty times over, but when you know what is likely to be true you can test a man's admissions.
There, again, is the constitutional shrinking, through a kind of metaphysical prejudice, from the concrete--that fear of the actual--in this case, of the Church of history; to which the admissions, which form so large a part of these volumes, naturally lead.
SOCRATES: Then it follows from your own admissions, that virtue is doing what you do with a part of virtue; for justice and the like are said by you to be parts of virtue.
If, I said, he makes a set speech and we make another recounting all the advantages of being just, and he answers and we rejoin, there must be a numbering and measuring of the goods which are claimed on either side, and in the end we shall want judges to decide; but if we proceed in our enquiry as we lately did, by making admissions to one another, we shall unite the offices of judge and advocate in our own persons.
You've made two damaging admissions, and I'm heartily with you in both.
His consenting at all to let her visit his patient seemed to afford one proof of this, and his readiness in making admissions which could scarcely have escaped the lips of an accomplice, certainly appeared to furnish another.
The Chief Inspector made those admissions with the frankness of a man whose reputation is established as if on a rock.
I concede both admissions to my honourable and learned friend.
Pontellier's admission greatly pleased Mademoiselle Reisz.