Adonis


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Related to Adonis: Narcissus, Adonis Complex

A·don·is

 (ə-dŏn′ĭs, ə-dō′nĭs)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A strikingly beautiful youth loved by Aphrodite, who transformed the drops of his blood into anemones after he was killed by a boar.
2. often adonis A handsome young man.

[Greek Adōnis, of Phoenician origin; see ʔd in Semitic roots.]

Adonis

(əˈdəʊnɪs)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a handsome youth loved by Aphrodite. Killed by a wild boar, he was believed to spend part of the year in the underworld and part on earth, symbolizing the vegetative cycle
2. a handsome young man
[C16: from Latin, via Greek Adōnis from Phoenician adōni my lord, a title of the god Tammuz; related to Hebrew Adonai]

A•don•is

(əˈdɒn ɪs, əˈdoʊ nɪs)

n.
1. a youth of Greek myth, slain by a wild boar, but brought back to life by Zeus and permitted to divide his time every year between Persephone and Aphrodite.
2. a very handsome young man.
A•don′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Adonis - any handsome young manadonis - any handsome young man    
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
2.Adonis - annual or perennial herbsAdonis - annual or perennial herbs    
magnoliid dicot genus - genus of dicotyledonous flowering plants regarded as among the most primitive of extant angiosperms
Adonis annua, pheasant's-eye - Eurasian herb cultivated for its deep red flowers with dark centers
3.Adonis - (Greek mythology) a handsome youth loved by both Aphrodite and PersephoneAdonis - (Greek mythology) a handsome youth loved by both Aphrodite and Persephone; "when Adonis died Zeus decreed that he should spend winters in the underworld with Persephone and spend summers with Aphrodite"
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
daemon, demigod - a person who is part mortal and part god
Translations

Adonis

[əˈdəʊnɪs] NAdonis

Adonis

n (Myth, fig) → Adonis m

Adonis

[əˈdəʊnɪs] nAdone m
References in classic literature ?
THAMMUZ came next behind, Whose annual wound in LEBANON allur'd The SYRIAN Damsels to lament his fate In amorous dittyes all a Summers day, While smooth ADONIS from his native Rock Ran purple to the Sea, suppos'd with blood Of THAMMUZ yearly wounded: the Love-tale Infected SIONS daughters with like heat, Whose wanton passions in the sacred Porch EZEKIEL saw, when by the Vision led His eye survay'd the dark Idolatries Of alienated JUDAH.
Upon my word, Basil, I didn't know you were so vain; and I really can't see any resemblance between you, with your rugged strong face and your coal-black hair, and this young Adonis, who looks as if he was made out of ivory and rose-leaves.
The only blemish was that this retired Adonis had nothing manly about him; he seemed to be employing this toilet varnish to hide the ruins occasioned by the military service of gallantry only.
They were alluring pictures, but through them all the brawny, half-naked figure of the giant Adonis of the jungle persisted in obtruding itself.
He was a handsome fellow, clean limbed and powerful, with an intelligent face and features of such exquisite chiselling that Adonis himself might have envied him.
The contrast was as striking as it could have been eighteen years before, when Rigg was a most unengaging kickable boy, and Raffles was the rather thick-set Adonis of bar-rooms and back-parlors.
my beau must be an Adonis indeed, Matilda, the admired of all beholders, if I am to be contented with him alone.
His wicked, bloodshot eyes and broad nose, his ample mouth and great fighting fangs only enhanced the claim of this Adonis of the forest upon the affections of his shes.
You may be old - it matters not; ugly - you will be fooled into reckoning yourself an Adonis.
Confronting him, with a face that was a composite of destroying angel and Adonis, was a man holding a smoking revolver.
At the end of this period Shakspere issued two rather long narrative poems on classical subjects, 'Venus and Adonis,' and 'The Rape of Lucrece,' dedicating them both to the young Earl of Southampton, who thus appears as his patron.
Jones now walked downstairs neatly drest, and perhaps the fair Adonis was not a lovelier figure; and yet he had no charms for my landlady; for as that good woman did not resemble Venus at all in her person, so neither did she in her taste.