adoptionist


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adoptionist

(əˈdɒpʃənɪst)
n
someone who believes in adoptionism
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers Alcuin's formation and reputation; the adoptionist crisis; mission, episcopy, and monarchy; the Bible; prayer; education; and poetry.
Canadian courts have long employed an adoptionist approach to customary international-law rules, provided there is no express conflict in Canadian law.
The main point on the agenda of the Council, apart from Horos' adoptionist heresy, was the discussion of the Nicaean concluding decree: (9) The Council of Frankfurt opposed the sacramental charge of the icons which is still found today in Orthodox cults where images are thought to mediate the presence of God.
Thus, making continuous references to proximate developments in Islam, Brown elaborates the adoptionist theology of the Ebionites, their federal universalism, their critique of kingship as of the temple priesthood, and their notion of baptism as the primary emblem of purification rather than redemptive sacrifice--all with a view to understanding, with Schoeps, the world-historical "paradox" by which "Jewish Christianity indeed disappeared within the Christian church, but was preserved in Islam" (27).
Strange as it may seem to some readers, the rather structured Roukema approved both the adoptionist and the catholic Christology.
It was, at least in part, the discussion of Christ's nature and the concern about how Christ's relationship to God the Father should be understood, a revival of the old Adoptionist controversy, that led to the introduction of the Roman rite in Spain.
In Charlemagne's days, the minds were agitated by the adoptionist controversy started by Felix of Urgel and Elipandus of Toledo, who affirmed that while Christ was the true Son of God, his human nature, "according to which he was a son of David", received God's Sonship through adoption by God (36).
Two letters expressing friendship, another four detailing collaborative plans for the fight against the Adoptionist heresy, and one more commending Benedict to a distant friend all bear witness to the strong tie between these two seminal figures.
finds that Rahner loses Jesus' humanity as the locus of salvation and that Pannenberg's Christology is adoptionist.
To achieve such an objective, they readily grasped at the adoptionist theories of the 1920s, which advocated the education of Africans "along their own lines".
Historically, Calvinists have tended to favor an adoptionist Christology described by Paul as Christ's "self-emptying" (kenosis) in his letter to the Philippi.
Victor also excommunicated Theodotus of Byzantium, the leader of the Adoptionist group that taught that Jesus was not the real son of God, but only God's 'adopted' son," McBrien adds, showing how rough Victor ruled the roost.