Adowa


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A·do·wa

 (ä′də-wə, ăd′ə-)
See Adwa.

Adowa

(ˈɑːdʊˌwɑː)
n
(Placename) a variant spelling of Aduwa
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References in periodicals archive ?
Berkeley, The Campaign of Adowa and the Rise of Menilik (London, [1902] 1935).
These early films were followed by Harvest 3000, set in Ethiopia; and Adwa, a documentary on the Italian defeat at Adowa by Emperor Menelik in 1896.
Joy Adowa, a Ghanaian, told Qatar Tribune that it was a great experience for her two children because they got an opportunity to watch their favourite characters live on stage.
It is not just a blend of other forms of music, but it is a combination of local rhythms like the Adowa, (1) instruments such as Kpanlogo drums (2), xylophones, flutes, thumb pianos, and samples of old highlife favorites like Alhaji Frimpong, Abrechieba Kofi Sammy, CK Mann, Gyedu Blay Ambolley, Amakye Dede, Nana Tufour, and A.
As they were the beacon of hope and symbol of liberty, freedom and independence for blacks and Orientals of the East in winning a resounding victory over foreign powers in Adowa in 1896, they are now enthusiastically demonstrating their efforts to the continuation of a historical responsibility to commit to regional integration and to the ultimate success of African Renaissance.
Anthony Bogues has established the link between the Rastafari and the radical African tradition, which had roots in Ethiopianism in the United States and the Back-to-Africa movement of the late nineteenth century, and both inspired by Ethiopia's defeat of Italy at Adowa in 1896 (Bogues 2003:154, 165; Gebrekidan 2005:39; Geiss 1974: 26-29).
Ethiopia's last successful sabre rattle was more than 100 years ago -- the Battle of Adowa in 1896 against Italy -- a force to fear faintly.
com)-- Award winning singer/songwriter/guitarist Taj Weekes and his band Adowa releases their fourth CD “Pariah in Transit” on Weekes' Jatta Records.
Following the battle of Adowa in 1896, (18) Britain, (19) France, (20) Italy, (21) and Ethiopia (22) demarcated colonial borders in Somalia.
519 rifles, 56 artillery guns, and no cavalry, according to George Fitz-Hardinge Berkeley in his book The Campaign of Adowa and the Rise of Menelik.
In 1896 an Ethiopian army all but wiped out an Italian army in the battle of Adowa.
And, after suffering a bitter defeat to Ethiopia at Adowa in 1896, Italian success in Libya became even more important to sustaining an emerging Italian racial pride.