bael

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Related to Aegle marmelos: Bael fruit

bael

(ˈbeɪəl)
n
1. (Plants) a spiny Indian rutaceous tree, Aegle marmelos
2. (Plants) the edible thick-shelled fruit of this tree
[C17: from Hindi bel]
References in periodicals archive ?
The activity of Aegle marmelos extracts was compared to that of the already characterized antitumor extracts from Emblica officinalis (Sharma et al.
The leaves of Aegle marmelos have been shown to possess analgesic properties (Sekar et al.
The plants that were cultivated for commercial purposes as well as used as medicinal plants included Mangifera indica, Annona squamosa, Cocos nucifera, Terminalia chebula, Lagenaria vulgaris, Momordica charantia, Dillenia indica, Cajanus cajan, Tamarindus indica, Cinnamomum tamala, Punica granatum, Moringa oleifera, Psidium guajava, Syzygium cumini, Syzygium samarangense, Averrhoa bilimbi, Averrhoa carambola, Piper betle, Zizyphus mauritiana, Aegle marmelos, Citrus aurantifolia, and Curcuma longa.
The second formulation was for treatment of dysentery (Serial Number 14), where crushed bark of Litsea monopetala was mixed with seeds of Mangifera indica, fruits of Aegle marmelos and mishri (crystalline sugar) and orally administered for treatment of dysentery.
Other plants like Dillenia indica, Emblica officinalis, Hibiscus rosa sinensis, Syzygium cumini, Aegle marmelos, Citrus limonum and Eletteria cardamomum are obtained from lands cultivated by nearby non-indigenous settlers, who cultivate these plants for personal consumption, commercial purposes or ornamental values.
Fruits of Aegle marmelos and Feronia limonia (particularly unripe fruits) have been traditionally used in the Indian sub-continent for alleviation of gastrointestinal disorders including diarrhea, dysentery, indigestion, loss of appetite, as well as constipation (Sharma et al.
Among plants cultivated for both home consumption and commercial purposes were Mangifera indica (mango), Areca catechu (betel nut), Borassus flabellifer (sugar palm), Cocos nucifera (coconut), Ananas comosus (pineapple), Carica papaya (papaya), Luffa cylindrica (vegetable sponge), Emblica officinalis (Indian gooseberry), Manihot esculenta (cassava), Cajanus cajan (spotted pigeon pea), Lablab purpureus (hyacinth bean), Tamarindus indica (tamarind), Punica granatum (pomegranate), Moringa oleifera (drumstick tree), Musa sapientum (banana), Psidium guajava (guava), Syzygium cumini (black plum), Averrhoa carambola (star fruit), Piper betle (betel leaf), Ziziphus mauritiana (Indian jujube), Aegle marmelos (wood apple), and Zingiber officinale (ginger).
For instance, to increase attraction of a female towards a particular male, the male person was advised to take any dirt from the female's neck, mix the dirt with the roots of Aegle marmelos and take the mixture orally (Serial Number 27).
The medicinal species on display included Adenium obesum known to have anti-tumour/antimicrobial properties, Aegle marmelos (anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory), Allamanda blanchetii (antimicrobial, antioxidants) and Allamanda cathartica (anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour).
Activity: Anthelmintic, Analgesic), 2- Adenium obesum (Activity: Antitumor, Antimicrobial), 3- Aegle marmelos (Activity: Anti-diabetic, Anti-inflammatory), 4- Ageratum Sp.