aerophone

(redirected from Aerophones)
Related to Aerophones: Idiophones, membranophones

aerophone

(ˈɛərəˌfəʊn)
n
any musical instrument in which sound is produced by air vibrations

aerophone

a type of ear trumpet used by the deaf.
See also: Deafness
an instrument for detecting the approach of aircraft by intensifying the sound waves it creates in the air.
See also: Aviation
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References in periodicals archive ?
Litwiniec (sax, aerophones, throat-singing and ethno instruments), Igor Gawlikowski (guitarist, composer and arranger) and Pawe?
It is interesting to reflect that in spite of its significant exposure on the Internet the qeej has not followed the trajectory of its fellow aerophones, the Japanese bamboo flute shakuhachi and the Indigenous Australian didjeridu, on the voyage into the realms of the "world music" scene.
To categorize instruments, I employ the modern classification system (Hornbostel and Sachs), which classifies all instruments into four main categories according to the way in which sound is produced: aerophones, idiophones, membranophones and chordophones.
Aerophones are instruments in which the sound is produced by air being blown through it, like flutes, whistles, panpipes and bagpipes.
Chapter Four is an overview of Kaulong solo instrumental music which is played exclusively on aerophones, otherwise known as wind instruments: lawi (raft panpipes), laresup and lasevarut (bundle panpipes), and lapilue (end-blown flute)--instruments that are often played in a programmatic way (that is, to tell a story, or depict an event or a character) and that can act as speech surrogates to express what otherwise remains unspoken.
The author chose to organize the organology section by first addressing general, historical, and regional studies of Spanish instruments, followed with the organological divisions of aerophones, chordophones, idiophones, and membranophones.
He was one of the few independent craftsmen from the interior who were still capable of competing with the factory production of wind instruments in Kraslice or the Brno firm of Josef Lidl (1864-1946)--the second biggest wind instrument factory in the Czech Lands, founded in 1892, which launched production of wind aerophones in 1895--, and Cerveny managed it above all by his consistent quality and unremitting modernisation.
Our knowledge of aerophones for ancient Israel/ Palestine would be incomplete without identifying exactly the kind of pipes that are depicted; neither the few archaeological finds nor the Old Testament record resolve the problems.
Sebastian Virdung and Martin Agricola in the sixteenth century divided the families into three major categories (further divided into four subcategories): chordophones (with keyboards, without keyboards, fretted and unfretted), aerophones (subdivided further as with finger holes, without finger holes, blown by bellows), and idiophones.
The set of 35 aerophones includes five recorders, three of them with maker's marks on the corpus that allow identification of the maker and in two cases the place of origin: "Hofer", "Harrach-Wien" and "Fischer in Eger".
In his study of aerophones, Olsen strives to avoid strictly Eurocentric terminology, also warning against the assumption that the evolution of an instrument reflects the cultural advancements of a given society.
The author then proceeds to describe in great detail a large number of musical instruments, following the logical taxonomy of idiophones, membranophones, aerophones, and dance.