Aesop


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Related to Aesop: Aesop Fables

Ae·sop

 (ē′səp, -sŏp′) Sixth century bc.
Greek fabulist traditionally considered the author of Aesop's Fables, including "The Tortoise and the Hare" and "The Fox and the Grapes."

Ae·so′pi·an (ē-sō′pē-ən), Ae·sop′ic (-sŏp′ĭk) adj.

Aesop

(ˈiːsɒp)
n
(Biography) ?620–564 bc, Greek author of fables in which animals are given human characters and used to satirize human failings
Aeˈsopian, Aeˈsopic adj

Ae•sop

(ˈi səp, ˈi sɒp)

n.
c620–c560 B.C., Greek writer of fables.
Ae•so•pi•an (iˈsoʊ pi ən, iˈsɒp i-) Ae•sop•ic (iˈsɒp ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aesop - Greek author of fables (circa 620-560 BC)Aesop - Greek author of fables (circa 620-560 BC)
Translations
Ezop

Aesop

[ˈiːsɒp] NEsopo
Aesop's FablesFábulas fpl de Esopo

Aesop

nÄsop m; Aesop’s fablesdie äsopischen Fabeln

Aesop

[ˈiːsɒp] nEsopo
References in classic literature ?
AEsop was a Greek slave who could not even write down his wonderful fables; yet all the world reads them.
Do you know, you speak Greek as well as AEsop did, my dear La Fontaine.
But we employ our wisdom to do good, instead of harm; so that horrid Aesop did not know what he was talking about.
One after another he comes up in his private adventures with every fable of Aesop, of Homer, of Hafiz, of Ariosto, of Chaucer, of Scott, and verifies them with his own head and hands.
THE LIFE and History of Aesop is involved, like that of Homer, the most famous of Greek poets, in much obscurity.
Mezeriac, the life of Aesop was from the pen of Maximus Planudes, a monk of Constantinople, who was sent on an embassy to Venice by the Byzantine Emperor Andronicus the elder, and who wrote in the early part of the fourteenth century.
Bayle thus characterises this Life of Aesop by Planudes, "Tous les habiles gens conviennent que c'est un roman, et que les absurdites grossieres qui l'on y trouve le rendent indigne de toute.
Phaedrus, the great imitator of Aesop, plainly indicates this double purpose to be the true office of the writer of fables.
The continual observance of this twofold aim creates the charm, and accounts for the universal favor, of the fables of Aesop.
Tis the simple manner," says Dodsley, 2 "in which the morals of Aesop are interwoven with his fables that distinguishes him, and gives him the preference over all other mythologists.
The great bulk of them are not the immediate work of Aesop.
The rhetoricians and philosophers were accustomed to give the Fables of Aesop as an exercise to their scholars, not only inviting them to discuss the moral of the tale, but also to practice and to perfect themselves thereby in style and rules of grammar, by making for themselves new and various versions of the fables.