Afroasiatic


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Af•ro•a•si•at•ic

or Af•ro-A•si•at•ic

(ˌæf roʊˌeɪ ʒiˈæt ɪk, -ˌeɪ ʃi-, -ˌeɪ zi-)

n.
1. a family of languages spoken or formerly spoken in SW Asia and Africa, having as branches Semitic, Egyptian, Berber, Cushitic, and Chadic.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Afroasiatic.
[1955–1960]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Afroasiatic - a large family of related languages spoken both in Asia and AfricaAfroasiatic - a large family of related languages spoken both in Asia and Africa
natural language, tongue - a human written or spoken language used by a community; opposed to e.g. a computer language
Chadic, Chadic language, Chad - a family of Afroasiatic tonal languages (mostly two tones) spoken in the regions west and south of Lake Chad in north central Africa
Semitic - a major branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family
Hamitic, Hamitic language - a group of languages in northern Africa related to Semitic
Egyptian - the ancient and now extinct language of Egypt under the Pharaohs; written records date back to 3000 BC
Berber - a cluster of related dialects that were once the major language of northern Africa west of Egypt; now spoken mostly in Morocco
Cushitic - a group of languages spoken in Ethiopia and Somalia and northwestern Kenya and adjacent regions
Omotic - a group of related languages spoken in a valley of southern Ethiopia; closely related to Cushitic languages
References in periodicals archive ?
The Omotic languages are linguistically the most divergent of the Afroasiatic language phylum, suggesting that Omotic speakers may have lived in southwestern Ethiopia for a long and sustained period of time.
Not even approaches that would support that of the author(s), notably Christopher Ehret's (1995) work on core elements in Afroasiatic vocabulary, are mentioned.
Further strengthening the African, African American, and Afrocentric voices in American universities, in 1987, Martin Bernal, an adjunct professor of Near-Eastern Studies at Cornell, published his Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization, which, in addition to claiming that the roots of Greek--and, thus, Western--civilisation were in Egypt and Phoenicia, attributed the denial of those roots--which, the author claims, was accepted and acknowledged until the end of the eighteenth century--to a nineteenth-century milieu permeated by notions of Romanticism, racism, and progress.
Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization, Volume II: The Archeological and Documentary Evidence.
Among the topics are a semantic map approach to a typology of impersonal constructions, impersonal constructs and accusative subjects in late Latin, the case of meteorological predication in Afroasiatic, a diachronic study of the impersonal passive in Ainu, and impersonal constructions in some Oceanic languages.
Related are Eurasiatic *watV and Afroasiatic *wat-.
In 1987, Martin Bernal sent shock waves through the academic world with his Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization (Rutgers University Press).
1, UCLA Center for Afro-American Studies (November 1977), 2; and Martin Bernal, Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization, Vol.
In Research in Afroasiatic Grammar II: Selected Papers from the Fifth Conference on Afroasiatic Languages, Paris, 2000, Jacqueline Lecarme (ed.
Bernal, Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization (New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1987-1991): Mary R.
In this latest broadside, he shows that the main issues he initially raised in 1987 with Black Athena: The Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilisation, Volume 1 -- The Fabrication of Ancient Greece 17851985 will just not go away, although many of his most vocal critics now fondly wish they would.