Agamemnon


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Related to Agamemnon: Trojan War, Achilles

Ag·a·mem·non

 (ăg′ə-mĕm′nŏn′, -nən)
n. Greek Mythology
The king of Mycenae and leader of the Greeks in the Trojan War, who was the son of Atreus and the father of Orestes, Electra, and Iphigenia. He was killed by his wife Clytemnestra upon his return from Troy.

Agamemnon

(ˌæɡəˈmɛmnɒn)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a king of Mycenae who led the Greeks at the siege of Troy. On his return home he was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus. See also Menelaus

Ag•a•mem•non

(ˌæg əˈmɛm nɒn, -nən)

n.
a legendary king of Mycenae, the son of Atreus and brother of Menelaus, who led the Greeks in the Trojan War and was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Agamemnon - (Greek mythology) the king who lead the Greeks against Troy in the Trojan War
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations

Agamemnon

[ˌægəˈmemnən] NAgamenón

Agamemnon

[ˈægəˈmɛmnɒn] nAgamennone m
References in classic literature ?
The Agamemnon of Aeschylus is based on this legend.
Look at Aegisthus; he must needs make love to Agamemnon's wife unrighteously and then kill Agamemnon, though he knew it would be the death of him; for I sent Mercury to warn him not to do either of these things, inasmuch as Orestes would be sure to take his revenge when he grew up and wanted to return home.
On this the rest of the Achaeans with one voice were for respecting the priest and taking the ransom that he offered; but not so Agamemnon, who spoke fiercely to him and sent him roughly away.
And Achilles answered, "Fear not, but speak as it is borne in upon you from heaven, for by Apollo, Calchas, to whom you pray, and whose oracles you reveal to us, not a Danaan at our ships shall lay his hand upon you, while I yet live to look upon the face of the earth--no, not though you name Agamemnon himself, who is by far the foremost of the Achaeans.
Draw up in the quarry—draw up, thou king of the Greeks; draw into the quarry, Agamemnon, or I shall never be able to pass you.
cried a smothered voice,” praise be God, I live; vill you, Mister Agamemnon, be pleas come down ici, and help me on my leg?
Lucretius the poet, when he beheld the act of Agamemnon, that could endure the sacrificing of his own daughter, exclaimed: Tantum Religio potuit suadere malorum.
What cared we for outward visions, when Agamemnon, Achilles, and a thousand other heroes of the great Past were marching in ghostly procession through our fancies?
But Homer's words are as costly and admirable to Homer as Agamemnon's victories are to Agamemnon.
Achilles, though Agamemnon, the sole offender, was neither fried nor
Then follow the incidents connected with the gathering of the Achaeans and their ultimate landing in Troy; and the story of the war is detailed up to the quarrel between Achilles and Agamemnon with which the "Iliad" begins.
You know the first lines of the Iliad, in which the poet says that Chryses prayed Agamemnon to release his daughter, and that Agamemnon flew into a passion with him; whereupon Chryses, failing of his object, invoked the anger of the God against the Achaeans.