Haggadah

(redirected from Aggadoth)
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Related to Aggadoth: Aggadot

Hag·ga·dah

also Hag·ga·da  (hä′gä-dä′, hə-gä′də, -gô′də)
n. pl. Hag·ga·doth (-dôt′, -dōt′, -dōs, -dəz) Judaism
1. Traditional Jewish literature, especially the nonlegal part of the Talmud. Also called Aggadah.
2. The book containing the story of the Exodus and the ritual of the Seder, read at the Passover Seder.

[Hebrew haggādâ, narration, telling, from higgîd, to narrate, tell; see ngd in Semitic roots.]

Haggadah

(həˈɡɑːdə; Hebrew haɡaˈdaː; -ɡɔˈdɔ) or

Haggodoh

n, pl -dahs, -das or -doth (Hebrew -ˈdoːt)
1. (Judaism)
a. a book containing the order of service of the traditional Passover meal
b. the narrative of the Exodus from Egypt that constitutes the main part of that service. See also Seder
2. (Judaism) another word for Aggadah
[C19: from Hebrew haggādāh a story, from hagged to tell]
haggadic, hagˈgadical adj

hag•ga•dah

or hag•ga•da

(həˈgɔ də, ˌhɑ gɑˈdɑ)

n., pl. -dahs or -das, -doth, -dot (-ˈdɔt)
1. a book containing the story of the Exodus, used at the Seder service on Passover.
2. (cap.) Aggadah.
[1855–60; < Hebrew; see Aggadah]
hag•gad•ic (həˈgæd ɪk, -ˈgɑ dɪk) hag•gad′i•cal, adj.

Haggada, Haggadah, Aggada, Aggadah

1. the explanatory matter in rabbinic and Talmudic literature, interpreting or illustrating the Scriptures.
2. a book in which is printed the liturgy for the Seder service. — haggadic, haggadical, adj.
See also: Judaism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haggadah - Talmudic literature that does not deal with law but is still part of Jewish traditionHaggadah - Talmudic literature that does not deal with law but is still part of Jewish tradition
Talmudic literature - (Judaism) ancient rabbinical writings
References in periodicals archive ?
The proof-text method at the heart of midrash, its dialogic nature, the inconclusiveness of midrash, the three forms of aggadoth, the intriguing petihtah or proem of many midrashim--such fundamentals, provocatively applied in later readings of Milton's poetry, are deftly covered in this opening chapter, providing the theoretical underpinning for Shoulson's sustained argument that "the impulse to argue with God is one embraced by Milton repeatedly and bears a striking resemblance to rabbinical modes of exegesis" (33).