agglomeration

(redirected from Agglomeration Economies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

ag·glom·er·a·tion

 (ə-glŏm′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of gathering into a mass.
2. A confused or jumbled mass: "To avoid the problems of large urban agglomerations, the state decentralized the university system" (Bickley Townsend).

ag•glom•er•a•tion

(əˌglɒm əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a jumbled cluster or mass of varied parts.
2. the act or process of agglomerating.
[1775]

Agglomeration

 a mass or clump of things gathered together; an unmethodical assemblage; a cluster. See also cluster, conglomerate.
Examples: an agglomeration of self-loving beings, 1866; of granite houses, 1859; of turrets, 1774.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agglomeration - a jumbled collection or mass
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
bunch, clump, cluster, clustering - a grouping of a number of similar things; "a bunch of trees"; "a cluster of admirers"
chunk, clod, glob, lump, clump, ball - a compact mass; "a ball of mud caught him on the shoulder"
2.agglomeration - the act of collecting in a mass; the act of agglomerating
assembling, collecting, aggregation, collection - the act of gathering something together

agglomeration

noun mass, collection, pile, cluster, lump, stack, heap, rick, clump, accumulation The album is a bizarre agglomeration of styles.

agglomeration

noun
A group of things gathered haphazardly:
Translations
aglomeracija
aglomerație

agglomeration

[əˌglɒməˈreɪʃən] Naglomeración f

agglomeration

[əˌglɒməˈreɪʃən] nagglomérat m

agglomeration

nAnhäufung f, → Konglomerat nt; (Sci) → Agglomeration f

agglomeration

[əglɒməˈreɪʃn] nagglomerazione f

ag·glom·er·a·tion

n. aglomeración, acumulación.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, from the late 1980s onwards, the return of globalisation processes with a vengeance was characterised by rapidly falling international and domestic spatial transactions costs (OECD, 2008b), increasing mutual openness between countries, increased international labour mobility, and a much greater importance for agglomeration economies.
lt;<Urban Concentration, Agglomeration Economies, and the Level of Economic Development>>.
It is generally believed that cost of living tends to first fall as city size increases due to emergence of agglomeration economies but as population increases diseconomies of scale and negative externalities like traffic congestion, high land rents and pollution set in that exceed the potential agglomeration economies.
In this paper, I use firm-level data and focus on potentially important supply side variables: tax rates and agglomeration economies.
While the main goals of these policies were to create agglomeration economies (or "external economies of scale") and to increase productivity, more recent approaches--with Michael Porter's (1990) cluster strategy being by far the most influential--have emphasized the positive impact that a regional context made up of geographically proximate and industry-related firms and institutions can have on entrepreneurial and innovative activities.
6) Marshall had acknowledged the existence of agglomeration economies (local external economies) as early as 1890.
Unfortunately, identifying such areas is very difficult; for example, the authors find little evidence that agglomeration economies are more important for smaller cities than for larger cities, or for more compact cities than for less compact cities.
Many economic geographers, economists and nowadays more international business and strategy scholars have seen agglomeration economies theories as a starting point for contemporary academic research.
This study compares the spatial patterns of finance, insurance and real estate firm concentration at inter-urban (for urban areas across Canada) and intra-urban (for the Toronto census metropolitan area) scales and attempts to ascertain to what extent agglomeration economies advantages are contributing to the spatial arrangement of these firms.
This hypothesis is an outgrowth of agglomeration theory, which suggests that firms and industries will benefit from the agglomeration economies that clusters generate.
Rosenthal and Strange consider the relationship between local industrial organization and agglomeration economies.