People of the Book

(redirected from Ahl al-Kitab)

People of the Book

pl.n. Islam
The followers of Abrahamic religions, especially Jews and Christians, considered in Islamic theology and jurisprudence to practice monotheism, to share certain fundamental beliefs with Islam about life after death and the Day of Judgment, and to possess a revelation from God in a book. The People of the Book are usually entitled to the status of dhimmis in Muslim lands, and the term has at times been extended to include followers of non-Abrahamic religions, such as Zoroastrians and Sikhs.

[Translation of Arabic 'ahl al-kitāb : 'ahl, family, people, followers + al-, the + kitāb, book.]
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So if you say that these religions have been abrogated, that is, they are no longer a way of salvation to God and in following them one can no longer go to Heaven, then half of the Qur'an becomes distorted and we are left with the monstrous view that Muslims are to protect the ahl al-kitab or the People of the Book so that they can go to Hell.
SHN: But the necessity of the rejection of their own religion by the ahl al-kitab when they come to know about Islam has also been rejected by a number of jurists (fuqaha'), not to talk about Sufis and so forth, who were very much against this view, but even among a lot of the fuqaha'.
It implies that the status of Ahl al-Kitab can be extended to all religious communities.
To encourage this common endeavor, he reformulated the expression of Ahl al-Kitab into "ahl al-maktab" (the literate people).
Stemming from this shared heritage, Jews (as well as Christians) are described by a special name in the Quran: "People of the Book", ahl al-kitab, or a "scriptured people".
The Qur'an requires that Muslims should respect the Ahl Al-Kitab, "The People of the Book".
Its allies in the Middle East, especially Saudi Arabia, justified US influence on the grounds that Americans were Christian and thus part of the Ahl al-Kitab (the people of the Book).
The focus of Sacred is summed up by the phrase Ahl al-Kitab (People of the Book), which is used in Muslim tradition to acknowledge and embrace both the Jewish and Christian as communities which received scriptures revealed by God before the revelation to the Prophet Muhammad.
Madigan's approach to the Qur'an sheds light on how the Qur'an actually can provide insight into the way it saw the ahl al-kitab relating to their kutub.
As such, of course, this i jaz would also be shared by other prophetic proclamations to the ahl al-kitab.
104/722), provides the following explanation for the opening verses of Surat al-Rum: "He mentioned the victory of Persia over the Rum and the victory of the Ram over Persia and the rejoicing of the believers for God's assistance of ahl al-kitab (people of the Book) over ahl al-awthan (idol worshippers).
550/1155) lists the following reasons: a) confirmation of the Prophet's promise; b) that the weakness of Persia strengthens the Arabs; c) that the Persians are not ahl al-kitab, whereas the Rum are Christians and have a kitab.