aidos


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aidos

(ˈaɪdɒs)
n
(in ancient Greece)shame
References in classic literature ?
with its catalogue of wrongdoings and violence ever increasing until Aidos and Nemesis are forced to leave mankind who thenceforward shall have `no remedy against evil'.
En Carmides la definicion de sophrosyne une a otras virtudes, ya sea como hesyquia, como aidos, como ta heautou prattein y como "auto-conocimiento".
Entramos asi en las implicaciones y la complejidad del aidos.
Alli, un Protagoras elocuente e inventivo narra a un Socrates esceptico el mito por el cual Zeus envio a Hermes con un regalo a los hombres; ese regalo era el arte de la politica y estaba compuesto por dos dones: dike (justicia) y aidos (respeto).
3) Aidos first occurs in Hippolytos' first speech (particularly important in establishing character and dramatic situation): the dedication to Artemis of a garland from an unmown meadow is described in such a way that every word has a literal sense; but there is a heavy charge of erotic sous-entendre, resistant to over-literal analysis.
What is certain is that aidos first occurs in a passage of dense erotic imagery; and that other words of this passage are later deployed in a way which capitalizes on this associative introduction.
However, Aidos also has defects that detract from its usefulness.
Cairns argues that aidos is "a unique way of looking at the world" (10), bound up with the values of Greek culture, especially honor.
Aristotle considered aidos to be a mean between shamelessness and excessive caution, and gave it a prominent role in the ethical education of mankind.
In view of these considerations, Belfiore concludes that tragic katharsis is an allopathic process, in which an ekplexis of fear and pity, aroused by the tragic plot, acts as a kind of 'drug' which interacts with shameless emotions in such a way as to remove them and restore the soul to a healthy emotional state, a state of aidos.
Barrett says that aidos is the last item on Phaidra's list of things which distract men from the good, not necessarily a pleasure, as she (and the audience) will have lost track of the syntax by that point and no longer take aidos necessarily as a pleasure.
All this is clearly directed at showing how Aristotle resolves the Platonic crux: "While he [Aristotle does not explicitly say that tragedy produces aidos, this view is not only in accord with Greek traditional views, it also best explains the theory of katharsis of pity and fear" (237).