hijacking

(redirected from Airplane hijacking)
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hi·jack

also high·jack (hī′jăk′)
tr.v. hi·jacked, hi·jack·ing, hi·jacks also high·jacked or high·jack·ing or high·jacks
1.
a. To seize control of (a vehicle such as an airplane or bus) by use of force, especially as a way of reaching an alternate destination or as an act of terrorism.
b. To kidnap (a person in a vehicle): people who have experienced the trauma of being hijacked.
c. To stop and rob (a vehicle in transit).
d. To steal (goods) from a vehicle in transit.
2.
a. To take control of (something) without permission or authorization and use it for one's own purposes: dissidents who hijacked the town council; spammers who hijacked a computer network.
b. To steal or appropriate for oneself: hijacked her story and used it in his own book.
n.
The act or an instance of hijacking.

[Probably back-formation from highjacker, perhaps from jacker, holdup man, from jack, to jacklight.]

hi′jack′er n.

hijacking

or

highjacking

n
the act or an instance of hijacking
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hijacking - robbery of a traveller or vehicle in transit or seizing control of a vehicle by the use of forcehijacking - robbery of a traveller or vehicle in transit or seizing control of a vehicle by the use of force
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
buccaneering, piracy - hijacking on the high seas or in similar contexts; taking a ship or plane away from the control of those who are legally entitled to it; "air piracy"
Translations

hijacking

[ˈhaɪdʒækɪŋ] Nsecuestro m (fig) → apropiación f

hijacking

[ˈhaɪdʒækɪŋ] n [plane] → détournement m; [train] → attaque f
car hijackings → vols mpl de voitures avec violence

hijacking

[ˈhaɪˌdʒækɪŋ] npirateria aerea; (incident) → dirottamento
References in periodicals archive ?
The key to resisting an airplane hijacking lies in gaining time and multiplying obstacles that can delay hijackers who attempt to seize control of aircraft.
And they have pioneered the terrorist arts of airplane hijacking and suicide bombing along the way, while waging an increasingly successful propaganda war against America, Israel, and the West, among Muslims in the Middle East and far beyond it.
His vicious resume included taking more than 1,500 civilians hostage, and leaving 120 of them dead, in the southern Russian town of Budennovsk in 1995; ordering the storming of a Moscow theater, resulting in the death of 129 people, in 2002; and dispatching suicide bombers to blow two Russian airliners out of the sky in 2004 -- to say nothing of the odd airplane hijacking, subway bombing and bloody rampage.
This newest edition is enhanced with the inclusion of information on preparing for biological and chemical warfare, what to do in the event of an airplane hijacking, electrical blackouts, child abduction, and escaping from high-rise buildings in an emergency.