tillandsia

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til·land·si·a

 (tĭ-lănd′zē-ə)
n.
Any of various usually epiphytic bromeliad plants of the genus Tillandsia, such as Spanish moss, of tropical and subtropical America.

[New Latin Tillandsia, genus name, after Elias Tillands (1640-1693), Finno-Swedish botanist.]

tillandsia

(tɪˈlændzɪə)
n
(Plants) any bromeliaceous epiphytic plant of the genus Tillandsia, such as Spanish moss, of tropical and subtropical America
[C18: New Latin, named after Elias Tillands (died 1693), Finno-Swedish botanist]

til•lands•i•a

(tɪˈlænd zi ə)

n., pl. -lands•i•as.
any of numerous New World bromeliads of the genus Tillandsia, of epiphytic habit, esp. Spanish moss.
[1755–65; < New Latin (Linnaeus), after Elias Tillands, 17th-century Finno-Swedish botanist; see -ia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tillandsia - large genus of epiphytic or terrestrial sparse-rooting tropical plants usually forming dense clumps or pendant massesTillandsia - large genus of epiphytic or terrestrial sparse-rooting tropical plants usually forming dense clumps or pendant masses
liliopsid genus, monocot genus - genus of flowering plants having a single cotyledon (embryonic leaf) in the seed
Bromeliaceae, family Bromeliaceae, pineapple family - a family of tropical American plants of order Xyridales including several (as the pineapple) of economic importance
black moss, long moss, old man's beard, Spanish moss, Tillandsia usneoides - dense festoons of greenish-grey hairlike flexuous strands anchored to tree trunks and branches by sparse wiry roots; southeastern United States and West Indies to South America
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