akimbo

(redirected from Akimbo arms)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

a·kim·bo

 (ə-kĭm′bō)
adv.
In or into a position in which the hands are on the hips and the elbows are bowed outward: children standing akimbo by the fence.
adj.
1. Placed in such a way as to have the hands on the hips and the elbows bowed outward: children standing with arms akimbo.
2. Being in a bent, bowed, or arched position: "There he remained, dead to the world, limbs akimbo, until we left" (Alex Shoumatoff).

[Middle English in kenebowe (perhaps originally "in jug-handles, bent like the handles of a jug" ) : in, in; see in1 + kenebowe (kene- perhaps from or akin to Old French chane, kane, quenne, jug, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle English canne, jar, pot; see can2 + bowe, bow, bend; see bow3).]

akimbo

(əˈkɪmbəʊ)
adj, adv
arms akimbo with arms akimbo with hands on hips and elbows projecting outwards
[C15 in kenebowe, literally: in keen bow, that is, in a sharp curve]

a•kim•bo

(əˈkɪm boʊ)

adj., adv.
with hand on hip and elbow bent outward: to stand with arms akimbo.
[1375–1425; Middle English in kenebowe]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.akimbo - (used of arms and legs) bent outward with the joint away from the bodyakimbo - (used of arms and legs) bent outward with the joint away from the body; "a tailor sitting with legs akimbo"; "stood with arms akimbo"
crooked - having or marked by bends or angles; not straight or aligned; "crooked country roads"; "crooked teeth"
Adv.1.akimbo - with hands on hips and elbows extending outwardakimbo - with hands on hips and elbows extending outward; "she stood there akimbo"
Translations

akimbo

[əˈkɪmbəʊ] ADV with arms akimboen jarras

akimbo

[əˈkɪmbəʊ] adj
with arms akimbo → les poings sur les hanches, les mains sur les hanches

akimbo

adv with arms akimbodie Arme in die Hüften gestemmt

akimbo

[əˈkɪmbəʊ] adv with arms akimbocon le mani sui fianchi
References in periodicals archive ?
A parabolic are beneath the chair mimics the curve of its arm as well as Temma's akimbo arms, the curves of her knees, and the folds of her dress; all of these arcs play off the hard angles of the chair legs and the walls behind them.