Cairo

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Cai·ro

 (kī′rō)
The capital and largest city of Egypt, in the northeast part of the country on the Nile River. Old Cairo was built c. 642 as a military camp; the new city was founded c. 968 by the Fatimid dynasty and reached its greatest prosperity under the Mameluke sultans (13th-16th century).

Cairo

(ˈkaɪrəʊ)
n
(Placename) the capital of Egypt, on the Nile: the largest city in Africa and in the Middle East; industrial centre; site of the university and mosque of Al Azhar (founded in 972). Pop: 11 146 000 (2005 est). Arabic name: El Qahira
ˈCairene n, adj

Cai•ro

(ˈkaɪ roʊ)

n.
the capital of Egypt, in the N part on the E bank of the Nile. 6,325,000.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cairo - a town at the southern tip of Illinois at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers
IL, Illinois, Land of Lincoln, Prairie State - a midwestern state in north-central United States
2.Cairo - the capital of Egypt and the largest city in AfricaCairo - the capital of Egypt and the largest city in Africa; a major port just to the south of the Nile delta; formerly the home of the Pharaohs
Arab Republic of Egypt, Egypt, United Arab Republic - a republic in northeastern Africa known as the United Arab Republic until 1971; site of an ancient civilization that flourished from 2600 to 30 BC
Cairene - a native or inhabitant of Cairo
Translations

Cairo

[ˈkaɪərəʊ] NEl Cairo

Cairo

[ˈkaɪrəʊ] nle Caire

Cairo

nKairo nt

Cairo

[ˈkaɪərəʊ] nil Cairo f
References in periodicals archive ?
Essa co-founded and was the chairman and editor-in-chief of a number of newspapers and magazines, including Al-Qahirah, Al-Ahaly and National Culture.
Taiz, Muharram 24, 1439, Oct 14, 2017, SPA -- King Salman Center for Relief and Humanitarian Works continued to deliver extra meals for displaced Yemeni students, in the Directorate of Al-Qahirah, in the Governorate of Taiz, to mitigate the suffering of them as well as their families.
Some of the important manifestations of this policy are the floundering of Fusul and Ibda' and their suffering from gaps, on the one hand, and, on the other, the issuing of official weeklies such as Akhbar al-Adab (1993) of Gamal al-Ghitani and al-Qahirah (1998) of Salah 'Isa.