Albion


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Al·bi·on

 (ăl′bē-ən)
England or Great Britain. Often used poetically.

Albion

(ˈælbɪən)
n
(Placename) archaic or poetic Britain or England
[C13: from Latin, of Celtic origin]

Al•bi•on

(ˈæl bi ən)

n. Chiefly Literary.
1. England.
2. Great Britain.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Albion - archaic name for England or Great Britain; used poetically
Translations
Albion

Albion

[ˈælbɪən] NAlbión f

Albion

n (poet)Albion nt
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References in classic literature ?
He begins with the coming of Brutus, the ancient hero who conquered Albion and changed its name to Britain, and he continues to about two hundred years after the death of Arthur.
You are going out, Micawber, to this distant clime, to strengthen, not to weaken, the connexion between yourself and Albion.
It is that which will strengthen, even in this step you are about to take, the connexion between yourself and Albion.
Soon we came within sight of the white cliffs of Albion.
When we reached Albion Place they were out; we went after them, and found them on the pier: Mrs.
Planchet was delighted to learn that the army was levied, and that he (Planchet) found himself a kind of half king, who from his throne-counter kept in pay a body of troops destined to make war against perfidious Albion, that enemy of all true French hearts.
It was as if a band of Italian days had come from the South, like a flock of glorious passenger birds, and lighted to rest them on the cliffs of Albion.
He put this second one so perseveringly that a stool and twelve shillings a week were at last found for Tip in the office of an attorney in a great National Palladium called the Palace Court; at that time one of a considerable list of everlasting bulwarks to the dignity and safety of Albion, whose places know them no more.
Weevle prizes most of all his few possessions (next after his light whiskers, for which he has an attachment that only whiskers can awaken in the breast of man) is a choice collection of copper-plate impressions from that truly national work The Divinities of Albion, or Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty, representing ladies of title and fashion in every variety of smirk that art, combined with capital, is capable of producing.
Whenever this powdered and courteous old man, who never missed a Sunday at the convent chapel at Hammersmith, and who was in all respects, thoughts, conduct, and bearing utterly unlike the bearded savages of his nation, who curse perfidious Albion, and scowl at you from over their cigars, in the Quadrant arcades at the present day-- whenever the old Chevalier de Talonrouge spoke of Mistress Osborne, he would first finish his pinch of snuff, flick away the remaining particles of dust with a graceful wave of his hand, gather up his fingers again into a bunch, and, bringing them up to his mouth, blow them open with a kiss, exclaiming, Ah