cirrhosis

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cir·rho·sis

 (sĭ-rō′sĭs)
n.
1. Any of various chronic diseases of the liver characterized by the replacement of normal tissue with fibrous tissue and the loss of functional liver cells, resulting from a variety of causes that include chronic alcoholism and certain diseases and infections, especially hepatitis C.
2. Chronic interstitial inflammation of any tissue or organ. No longer in clinical use.

[New Latin : Greek kirros, tawny (from the color of the diseased liver) + -osis.]

cir·rhot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

cirrhosis

(sɪˈrəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) any of various progressive diseases of the liver, characterized by death of liver cells, irreversible fibrosis, etc: caused by inadequate diet, excessive alcohol, chronic infection, etc. Also called: cirrhosis of the liver
[C19: New Latin, from Greek kirrhos orange-coloured + -osis; referring to the appearance of the diseased liver]
cirˈrhosed adj
cirrhotic adj

cir•rho•sis

(sɪˈroʊ sɪs)

n.
a chronic disease of the liver in which fibrous tissue invades and replaces normal tissue, disrupting important functions, as digestion and detoxification.
[1830–40; < Greek kirrh(ós) tawny orange + -osis]
cir•rhot′ic (-ˈrɒt ɪk) adj.
cir•rhosed′, adj.

cir·rho·sis

(sĭ-rō′sĭs)
A liver disease in which normal liver cells are gradually replaced by scar tissue, causing the organ to shrink, harden, and lose its function. Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by chronic alcohol abuse.

cirrhosis

a degenerative disease of the liver, marked by an excessive formation of tissue and contraction of the organ, usually brought on by chronic alcohol abuse. — cirrhotic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness

cirrhosis

Chronic inflammation of the liver (caused by severe alcoholism or hepatitis) leads to the death of liver cells. Fibrous scar tissue can build up and interfere with the liver’s functioning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cirrhosis - a chronic disease interfering with the normal functioning of the liver; the major cause is chronic alcoholism
liver disease - a disease affecting the liver
Translations

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] Ncirrosis f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] ncirrhose f cirrhosis of the livercirrhosis of the liver ncirrhose f du foie

cirrhosis

nZirrhose f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] n (also cirrhosis of the liver) → cirrosi f inv (epatica)

cir·rho·sis

n. cirrosis, enfermedad asociada con infl. intersticial, fallo en la función de hepatocitos y trastornos en la circulación de la sangre en el hígado;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
biliary ______ biliar.

cirrhosis

n cirrosis f; primary biliary — cirrosis biliar primaria
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, the most common aetiology of cirrhosis was found to be alcoholic liver cirrhosis (73.
myopathy) is common in patients with AUD, and its incidence exceeds that of alcoholic liver cirrhosis.
This cross-sectional study included 187 patients, eighteen years of age or older, who were divided into two groups: the control group (n = 130), which consisted of subjects with ethanol consumption [less than or equal to] 10 g/day and an AUDIT score [less than or equal to] 7, and the alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) group (n = 57), which was made up of patients that presented with alcoholism in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) (ethanol consumption [greater than or equal to] 70 g/day in men and ethanol consumption [greater than or equal to] 50 g/day in women in the last 5 years) and a diagnosis of cirrhosis of the liver.
In Asians, polymorphisms of the ADH1B and ADH1C genes were associated with the development of alcoholism and susceptibility to alcoholic liver cirrhosis [16,17,19,20].
ALD represents a spectrum of alcohol-related liver diseases of increasing severity--alcoholic steatosis (alcoholic fatty liver disease), alcoholic steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver cirrhosis as well as acute alcoholic hepatitis (1).
Finally, we estimated the absolute 10-year risk of alcoholic liver cirrhosis as a function of combined increased plasma YKL-40 concentrations and excessive alcohol intake.
Alcoholic liver disease or alcoholic liver cirrhosis develops in 10 to 20% of people who drink heavily for a decade or more.