Aldebaran

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Al·deb·a·ran

 (ăl-dĕb′ər-ən)
n.
A binary star in the constellation Taurus, 68 light years from Earth, and one of the brightest stars in the sky.

[Middle English Aldeboran, from Medieval Latin Aldebaran, from Arabic ad-dabarān : al-, the + dabarān, following (the Pleiades) (from dabara, to follow; see dpr in the Appendix of Semitic roots).]

Aldebaran

(ælˈdɛbərən)
n
(Astronomy) a binary star, one component of which is a red giant, the brightest star in the constellation Taurus. It appears in the sky close to the star cluster Hyades. Visual magnitude: 0.85; spectral type: K5III; distance: 65 light years
[C14: via Medieval Latin from Arabic al-dabarān the follower (of the Pleiades)]

Al•deb•a•ran

(ælˈdɛb ər ən)

n.
a first-magnitude star, orange in color, in the constellation Taurus.
[< Arabic al the + dabarān follower]

Al·deb·a·ran

(ăl-dĕb′ər-ən)
A very bright binary star in the constellation Taurus. See Note at Rigel.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aldebaran - the brightest star in TaurusAldebaran - the brightest star in Taurus  
Taurus - a zodiacal constellation in the northern hemisphere near Orion; between Aries and Gemini
References in periodicals archive ?
Bruno Maisonnier, CEO, Aldeberan Robotics, said robots are learning and demonstrating body language, which is "60 per cent of our communication", and even "understanding" very basic emotions, such as if a person is sad or happy, based on their tone of voice, facial expressions, choice of words and body language.
Slightly warmer stars, like Aldeberan in the constellation Taurus, look orange, a little higher in the spectrum of colors that the human eye can see.
But it had not all been poor observing at the Cape, as Ainslie explained that the clearness and beauty of the night sky, especially in January, when 'the glorious procession of stars from Capella and Aldeberan, through Orion, Sirius and Canopus down to the Southern Cross and alpha and beta Centauri passed overhead' had impressed him more than anything else, except, perhaps, the Victoria Falls.