Alexandrianism


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Alexandrianism

the style and theories of the Greek writers of Alexandria, 325-30 B.C., whose style was highly ornamented and obscure and favored such forms as the elegy, epigram, epyllion, and lyric and also ventured into the drama. — Alexandrianist, n., adj.
See also: Literature
the style and theories of the Greek writers of Alexandria, 325-30 B.C., whose style was highly ornamented and obscure and favored such forms as the elegy, epigram, epyllion, and lyric and also ventured into the drama. — Alexandrianist, n., adj.
See also: Greece and Greeks
References in periodicals archive ?
2) The cultural context described by Aurel Codoban is one of cultural Alexandrianism, typical of communities in Alexandria, during the period prior to the birth of Christianity, a cultural context characterized by syncretism and search for new forms to coelesce cultural expression.
Goodyear 1965, 99-100, who sees the exotic place names as the primary marker of Alexandrianism.
Initially the entanglement was not easy to discern, but the more embattled the discipline became it made explicit that an Alexandrianism has befallen the field in the form of academicism fostering creative quiescence.
Latin literature even ceased to exist independently: for Friedrich Schlegel, Virgil represented not the culmination of Latin literature but the decadent nadir of Alexandrianism.
Her sensationalism has become "motionless Alexandrianism," as Clement Greenberg called it; that is, the mechanical repetition of cliche.
70) This is not to suggest that by parodying Maecenas Petronius was also poking fun at Nero: as Mayer and others have demonstrated, Alexandrianism remained a dominant literary influence after the time of Augustus.
57) That any of this should have been lost on an ardent adherent of Alexandrianism seems unlikely.
Still, perhaps the time has come for this kind of alexandrianism.
16) Peter Knox argues that the Speech of Pythagoras may be taken as a symptom of Ovid's Alexandrianism, pointing to Callimachus' use of Pythagoras in his poetry;(17) the Apollonian imitations of Empedocles show that in using this model as well Ovid continues an Alexandrian interest in earlier scientific poetry.