alexandrine

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Related to Alexandrines: Alexandrine Verse

al·ex·an·drine

also Al·ex·an·drine  (ăl′ĭg-zăn′drĭn)
n.
1. A line of English verse composed in iambic hexameter, usually with a caesura after the third foot.
2. A line of French verse consisting of 12 syllables with a caesura usually falling after the sixth syllable.
adj.
Characterized by or composed in either of these meters.

[French alexandrin, from Old French, from Alexandre, title of a romance about Alexander the Great that was written in this meter.]

Alexandrine

(ˌælɪɡˈzændraɪn; -drɪn; -ˈzɑːn-) prosody
n
(Poetry) a line of verse having six iambic feet, usually with a caesura after the third foot
adj
(Poetry) of, characterized by, or written in Alexandrines
[C16: from French alexandrin, from Alexandre, title of 15th-century poem written in this metre]

al•ex•an•drine

(ˌæl ɪgˈzæn drɪn, -drin, -ˈzɑn-)

n.
1. (often cap.) a line of poetry in iambic hexameter.
adj.
2. (often cap.) of or pertaining to such a line.
[1580–90; < Middle French alexandrin, after Alexandre, from the use of this meter in an Old French poem on Alexander the Great]

Alexandrine

an iambic hexameter, or iambic verse with six feet.
See also: Verse

alexandrine

A line of verse in iambic hexameter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Alexandrine - (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
line of poetry, line of verse - a single line of words in a poem
Translations

alexandrine

[ˌælɪgˈzændraɪn] Nalejandrino m

alexandrine

nAlexandriner m
adjalexandrinisch
References in classic literature ?
Conceivable the collection was arranged in the Alexandrine period.
and in the last line the iambic pentameter gives place to an Alexandrine (an iambic hexameter).
There was the Odeon quite near them, and Philip soon shared his friend's passion for the tragedians of Louis XIV and the sonorous Alexandrine.
One must eat every day, and the finest Alexandrine verses are not worth a bit of Brie cheese.
Celebrating for "Ayam El Torath Al Sakandary" [Alexandrian Heritage Days], the event is a collaboration work between The Alexandria Project and The Centre d'AaAaAeAeAaAaAeA{tudes Alexandrines [Alexand Studies Center], (CE Alex).
In Nicaragua, where he was born, there has always been a custom of celebrating him by composing mini-essays on tiny themes, which decorate the newspapersessays on Dario's mastery of classical meter in a dozen forms, or his innovative 13-syllable alexandrines, or his handiness at dactylic feet, or his debt to the Spanish poets of the Centuries of Gold.
Ross further explains: "The rhyming alexandrines immediately give us the sense of a classical poem, and the diction is essentially simple, yet poetic" (xxi).
Atef Abou Bacha a declare que le mouvement Suzanne Moubarak de la femme pour la paix poursuivait ses activites dans les ecoles alexandrines pour la seconde annee consecutive afin de propager parmi le plus grand nombre possible d'eleves a Alexandrie la valeur de la culture de la paix.
The volume contains the following essays: Danielle Jacquart and Charles Burnett, "Avant-propos"; Brigitte Mondrain, "Traces et memoire de la lecture des textes: les marginalia dans les manuscrits scientifiques byzantins"; Henri Hugonnard-Roche, "Scolies syriaques au Peri Hermeneias d'Aristote"; Marwan Rashed, "Les marginalia d'Arethas, Ibn-al-Tayyib et les dernieres gloses alexandrines a YOrganon"; Emilie Savage-Smith, "Between Reader and Text: Some Medieval Arabic Marginalia", Tony Levy, "Le manuscrit hebreu Munich 36 et ses marginalia: un temoin de l'histoire textuelle des Elements d'Euclide au Moyen Age"; Wesley M.
A fascinating discussion of Herodiade's lexical and accentual haunting of Mallarme's later alexandrines focuses on the sites of tension between harmony and disruption that inscribe the drama of the illusory Ideal.
This volume publishes the results of excavations carried out in 1997-98 in the necropolis of Gabbari, on the west side of Alexandria, by the Centre des Etudes Alexandrines (CEA) under the direction of Jean-Yves Empereur.
It is more pro saic than poetic and was probably not meant to be sung, its couplets of long alexandrines extending the bitter and poignant lines recommended by Sebillet to heroic lengths (179).