alternating current

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al·ter·nat·ing current

(ôl′tər-nā′tĭng, ăl′-)
n. Abbr. AC
An electric current that reverses direction in a circuit at regular intervals.

alternating current

n
(Electrical Engineering) a continuous electric current that periodically reverses direction, usually sinusoidally. Abbreviation: AC Compare: direct current

al′ternating cur′rent


n.
an electric current that reverses direction at regular intervals, having a magnitude that varies continuously in a sinusoidal manner. Abbr.: AC Compare direct current.
[1830–40]

al·ter·nat·ing current

(ôl′tər-nā′tĭng)
An electric current that reverses its direction of flow at regular intervals. Because the voltage of alternating current can be easily controlled with transformers, this is the type of electricity generated by power stations. The transformers raise the voltage to make it easier to transmit over long distances, then lower the voltage for safer use in homes and buildings. Compare direct current. See Notes at current, Tesla.

alternating current

A rapidly reversing electric current.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alternating current - an electric current that reverses direction sinusoidallyalternating current - an electric current that reverses direction sinusoidally; "In the US most household current is AC at 60 cycles per second"
electrical energy, electricity - energy made available by the flow of electric charge through a conductor; "they built a car that runs on electricity"
direct current, direct electric current, DC - an electric current that flows in one direction steadily
Translations

alternating current

[ˈɒltəneɪtɪŋˈkʌrnt] ncorrente f alternata
References in periodicals archive ?
So although the alternating currents won the war that time but the flames of the war are still alive and have entered in post-war zone.
For instance, one of the more heated arguments of the day was between Edison and his rival George Westinghouse, who wanted to use alternating currents in his own power plants rather than the direct current favored by the "Wizard of Menlo Park.
More than 380 elementary students filled the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza's Scherr Forum Theatre on Wednesday morning and listened as Krampf explained the whys and hows of static and current electricity, amps, volts and the difference between direct and alternating currents.

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