altruism

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Related to Altruists: unselfishness, altruism

al·tru·ism

 (ăl′tro͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.
2. Zoology Instinctive behavior that is detrimental to the individual but favors the survival or spread of that individual's genes, as by benefiting its relatives.

[French altruisme, probably from Italian altrui, someone else, from Latin alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

al′tru·ist n.
al′tru·is′tic adj.
al′tru·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

altruism

(ˈæltruːˌɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that right action is that which produces the greatest benefit to others
[C19: from French altruisme, from Italian altrui others, from Latin alterī, plural of alter other]
ˈaltruist n
ˌaltruˈistic adj
ˌaltruˈistically adv

al•tru•ism

(ˈæl truˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others (opposed to egoism).
2. behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.
[1850–55; < French altruisme=autru(i) others + -isme -ism]
al′tru•ist, n.
al`tru•is′tic, adj.
al`tru•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

altruism

a concern or regard for the needs of others, entirely without ulterior motive. — altruist, n.altruistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of othersaltruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
egocentrism, self-centeredness, self-concern, self-interest, egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare

altruism

altruism

noun
Translations
altruismus
altruizam
利他主義
altruism

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzəm] Naltruismo m

altruism

[ˈæltruɪzəm] naltruisme m

altruism

nAltruismus m

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzm] naltruismo
References in periodicals archive ?
If the active users were themselves fully compensated such that their utility levels were restored precisely, the utility levels of nonparentalistic altruists ipso facto would be restored too.
He has never made a secret of the fact that he is not one of nature's altruists, but a refusal to suffer fools at any price can be unfairly interpreted as selfishness.
As Razin and I show, in order not to be manipulated, altruists will condition transfers on the donee's earnings or saving behavior.
Some of the new laborers were altruists who like to clean birds for free.
Four distinct employee value segments emerged - Altruists, Drivers, Pioneers and Stabilizers.
Cabot's team of cooks and volunteers whip up an assortment of delicious, nutrient packed dishes to help sustain teams of hard working altruists.
Studies also suggest that by helping other people, altruists not only get pleasure and enhance their mood, but also boost their health and maybe even extend their lives.
This, the study authors report, is in contrast to previous studies that positioned chimpanzees as reluctant altruists and led to the widely held belief that human altruism evolved in the last six million years only after humans split from apes.
I have seen heroes, but also cowards, altruists and crooks.
But, sadly, clever people aren't all altruists and philanthropists.
What's more puzzling is why the promarket side views celebrity altruists with such a jaundiced eye.
It is certainly not good for subjects to believe that the experiment is actually a treatment that will help them, but making clear to subjects that they may not benefit therapeutically from the study does not mean that all research subjects--or research donors--must be committed altruists.