altruism

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Related to Altruists: unselfishness, altruism

al·tru·ism

 (ăl′tro͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.
2. Zoology Instinctive behavior that is detrimental to the individual but favors the survival or spread of that individual's genes, as by benefiting its relatives.

[French altruisme, probably from Italian altrui, someone else, from Latin alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

al′tru·ist n.
al′tru·is′tic adj.
al′tru·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

altruism

(ˈæltruːˌɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that right action is that which produces the greatest benefit to others
[C19: from French altruisme, from Italian altrui others, from Latin alterī, plural of alter other]
ˈaltruist n
ˌaltruˈistic adj
ˌaltruˈistically adv

al•tru•ism

(ˈæl truˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others (opposed to egoism).
2. behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.
[1850–55; < French altruisme=autru(i) others + -isme -ism]
al′tru•ist, n.
al`tru•is′tic, adj.
al`tru•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

altruism

a concern or regard for the needs of others, entirely without ulterior motive. — altruist, n.altruistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of othersaltruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
egocentrism, self-centeredness, self-concern, self-interest, egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare

altruism

altruism

noun
Translations
altruismus
altruizam
利他主義
altruism

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzəm] Naltruismo m

altruism

[ˈæltruɪzəm] naltruisme m

altruism

nAltruismus m

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzm] naltruismo
References in periodicals archive ?
We look toward the altruists and the wealthy to help, and we see ourselves as mere extras in a Hollywood action movie, just waiting for the "chosen one" to save the others.
Summary: 'Real altruists are made not born,' says renowned educational psychologist at Shaikh Mohammad Bin Zayed's Ramadan majlis
In the right amygdala, an emotion-sensitive brain region, altruists displayed greater neural activity.
Altruists therefore are assumed to self-sacrifice for the good of the many.
We found that people who are work and life altruists, the givers, are more engaged.
Based on an extensive review of open-source journalistic reports, we examined the available psychobiographic information and histories of 43 lone wolf terrorists and have been able to differentiate four types of lone wolves: glory seekers, hero worshipers, lonely romantics, and radical altruists (Behav.
La mnemotecnia propuesta por Fieser [8] "All Altruists Gladly Make Gum In Gallon Tanks" es una frase que ha tenido gran aceptacion pero no relaciona de ninguna manera los nombres con sus estructuras.
Card-carrying altruists would approve of fines for tax dodgers or folks who sneak onto the subway, as psychological test-games have shown.
Not because the Albanian politicians were altruists who thought about the sensitivity or are so provident to predict the new trends but simply did not want the country to be recognized and identified according to only one nation.
We try to identify a new group of altruists each year, though several people here are returning to the list because of an important donation or project announced since a year ago.
Barring committed altruists, most people won't opt for a city requiring a huge personal commitment and considerable risk.
Olmsted and the landscape architects that followed had to be true altruists, because he never got to see the results of much of his work in Boston and Brookline--he had to know that oftentimes when he planted a tree, he'd be long dead before it was anything more than a sapling," Banks says.