dementia

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de·men·tia

 (dĭ-mĕn′shə)
n.
Loss of cognitive abilities, including memory, concentration, communication, planning, and abstract thinking, resulting from brain injury or from a disease such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. It is sometimes accompanied by emotional disturbance and personality changes.

[Latin dēmentia, madness, from dēmēns, dēment-, senseless; see dement.]

de·men′tial adj.

dementia

(dɪˈmɛnʃə; -ʃɪə)
n
(Pathology) a state of serious emotional and mental deterioration, of organic or functional origin
[C19: from Latin: madness; see dement]

de•men•tia

(dɪˈmɛn ʃə, -ʃi ə)

n.
severely impaired memory and reasoning ability, usu. with disturbed behavior, associated with damaged brain tissue.
[1800–10; < Latin dēmentia madness <dē- de- + mēns mind + -ia -ia]
de•men′tial, adj.

dementia

madness or insanity. Cf. amentia.
See also: Insanity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dementia - mental deterioration of organic or functional origin
insanity - relatively permanent disorder of the mind
alcohol amnestic disorder, alcoholic dementia, Korsakoff's psychosis, Korsakoff's syndrome, Korsakov's psychosis, Korsakov's syndrome, polyneuritic psychosis - dementia observed during the last stages of severe chronic alcoholism; involves loss of memory for recent events although long term memory is intact
presenile dementia - dementia with onset before the age of 65
senile dementia, senile psychosis - dementia of the aged; results from degeneration of the brain in the absence of cerebrovascular disease

dementia

noun
Serious mental illness or disorder impairing a person's capacity to function normally and safely:
Psychiatry: mania.
Psychology: aberration, alienation.
Translations
demence
demens
dementia
demencijasilpnaprotystė
demens

dementia

[dɪˈmenʃɪə] Ndemencia f
senile dementiademencia f senil

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃiə dɪˈmɛnʃə] ndémence fdemerara sugar [ˌdɛmərɛərəˈʃʊgər] (British) nsucre m roux, cassonade f

dementia

nSchwachsinn m, → Demenz f (spec); dementia praecoxJugendirresein nt, → Dementia praecox f (spec)

dementia

[dɪˈmɛnʃɪə] n (Med) → demenza

de·men·ti·a

n. demencia, locura; declinación de las funciones mentales;
___ paralytica___ paralítica;
___ praecox___ precoz, esquizofrenia;
organic ______ orgánica;
senile ______ senil.

dementia

n demencia; Alzheimer’s — demencia de Alzheimer, demencia tipo Alzheimer; — pugilistica demencia pugilística; multi-infarct — (ant) demencia vascular, demencia multiinfarto (ant); vascular — demencia vascular
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, the rates of dementia are increasing in this country, with Alzheimer's dementia affecting 5.
By 2060, about 15 million American citizens will have Alzheimer's dementia or mild cognitive impairment, according to a new study.
USA], Sep 30 (ANI): A team of researchers has recently suggested that a drug - donepezil - is most likely to enhance concentration, memory, alertness and moods in patients with Alzheimer's dementia.
5 million Americans now have Alzheimer's dementia, up from 5.
A second phase III trial, DAYBREAK-ALZ, in patients with mild Alzheimer's dementia is likely to start this quarter.
The amnestic, or loss of memory, form of MCI (aMCI) also has been identified as an early symptom of Alzheimer's dementia.
The drug, commonly used to treat epilepsy, calms hyperactivity in the brain of patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a clinically recognized condition in which memory impairment is greater than expected for a person's age and which greatly increases risk for Alzheimer's dementia, according to the study conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University and published this week in NeuroImage: Clinical.
Participants who tested positive for amyloid on florbetapir (Amyvid) PET scan at baseline were five times more likely to convert to Alzheimer's dementia within 3 years than were amyloid-negative subjects, data from the large, multisite imaging registry showed.
Alzheimer's dementia is the most ordinary type of dementia and encoding of unambiguous declarative information is the chief memory shortfall in it.
In the first study of its kind, researchers have determined that spending time with horses eases symptoms of Alzheimer's dementia.
This alliance moves us one step closer to achieving our goal of making Alzheimer's dementia preventable by 2025.
An International Classification of Disease10th Edition (ICD-10) criterion for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's Dementia was used in this study and patients were selected through consecutive sampling.

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