laws

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laws

  • autonomy - From Greek autos, "self," and nomos, "law," i.e. a person or unit that makes its own laws.
  • blue sky laws - Laws protecting the public from securities fraud.
  • code, codex - Code, from Latin codex, meaning "block of wood split into tablets, document written on wood tablets," was first a set of laws.
  • constitute, constitution - Constitute can mean "make laws" and a constitution is a "how-to" document for a government or organization.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laws - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unitLaws - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unit
Book of Genesis, Genesis - the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers
Book of Exodus, Exodus - the second book of the Old Testament: tells of the departure of the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt led by Moses; God gave them the Ten Commandments and the rest of Mosaic law on Mount Sinai during the Exodus
Book of Leviticus, Leviticus - the third book of the Old Testament; contains Levitical law and ritual precedents
Book of Numbers, Numbers - the fourth book of the Old Testament; contains a record of the number of Israelites who followed Moses out of Egypt
Book of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomy - the fifth book of the Old Testament; contains a second statement of Mosaic law
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Hebrew Scripture, Tanach, Tanakh - the Jewish scriptures which consist of three divisions--the Torah and the Prophets and the Writings
References in periodicals archive ?
Amdahl's Law was a state-of-the-art analytical model that guided software developers to evaluate the actual speedup that could be achieved by using parallel programs, or hardware designers to draw much more elaborate microarchitecture and components.
He also formulated Amdahl's Law, a formula that predicts the theoretical maximum improvement possible using multiple processors.
A simple, yet insightful, observation, Amdahl's law continues to serve as a guideline for parallel programmers to assess the upper bounds of attainable performance.
In 1988, Gustafson wrote Reevaluating Amdahl's Law to address limitations of Amdahl s Law, which models the maximum potential performance improvement from parallel processing.
There are still computational limiting factors however, such as Amdahl's law, which is a mathematical approximation of the speedup resultant from splitting a program into parallel threads/processors.
Typically, the way around Amdahl's Law is to simply find embarrassingly parallel problems, but you can't escape the fact you're limited by the serial portion of your calculations.
You can simply apply Amdahl's law of 'diminishing returns'-which roughly translated tells us that things will get faster, smaller and have more features we don't want by a factor of two each year.
The additional microprocessor muscle has given most commercial applications only a partial boost, as predicted by Amdahl's law of balanced system performance.
Amdahl's law indicates that the maximum speedup, even on a parallel system with an infinite number of processors, cannot exceed 1/k, where k is the fraction of operations that cannot be executed in parallel.
CONTENTS: Table of contents Executive summary In a nutshell Key messages Limitations of Moore's Law Symmetric multi-processing is the way forward SMP requires a different approach to software From serial execution to parallel programming Multi-cores versus many-cores Multiple cores create their own limitations The benefits and barriers of SMP Benefits of using SMP processors Barriers to using SMP processors Devices will go multi-core Customers are demanding higher performance ARM is driving embedded SMP adoption Operating system support for SMP is on its way Recommendations Service providers Handset manufacturers OS vendors Application vendors Table of figures Figure 1 Simplified illustration of SMP architecture Figure 2 Amdahl's Law
The performance obtained by this typical parallelization is limited according to Amdahl's law [8][9][10][11].
Gustafson makes some interesting points about how Amdahl's law can be misapplied, leading to some unnecessarily pessimistic predictions of the potential efficiency of parallel computers.