Americanism


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A·mer·i·can·ism

 (ə-mĕr′ĭ-kə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. A custom, trait, or tradition originating in the United States.
2. A word, phrase, or idiom characteristic of English as it is spoken in the United States.
3. Allegiance to the United States and its customs and institutions.

Americanism

(əˈmɛrɪkəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. a custom, linguistic usage, or other feature peculiar to or characteristic of the United States, its people, or their culture
2. loyalty to the United States, its people, customs, etc

A•mer•i•can•ism

(əˈmɛr ɪ kəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. a custom, trait, or thing peculiar to the United States of America or its citizens.
2. a word, phrase, or other language feature peculiar to or characteristic of American English.
3. devotion to or preference for the U.S. and its institutions.
[1775–85, Amer.]

Americanism

a word, phrase, or idiom peculiar to American English. Cf. Briticism, Canadianism.
See also: Language
Heckerism.
See also: Catholicism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Americanism - loyalty to the United States and its institutionsAmericanism - loyalty to the United States and its institutions
nationalism, patriotism - love of country and willingness to sacrifice for it; "they rode the same wave of popular patriotism"; "British nationalism was in the air and patriotic sentiments ran high"
2.Americanism - an expression that is characteristic of English as spoken by Americans
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
3.Americanism - a custom that is peculiar to the United States or its citizens
custom, usage, usance - accepted or habitual practice
Translations
amerikanismi
amerikanizam

Americanism

[əˈmerɪkənɪzəm] Namericanismo m

Americanism

[əˈmɛrɪkənɪzəm] n
(= phrase or usage) → américanisme m
(= fact of being American) → américanisme m

Americanism

n
(Ling) → Amerikanismus m
(= quality)Amerikanertum nt

americanism

[əˈmɛrɪkənɪzm] namericanismo
References in classic literature ?
To use and Americanism, he had `taken no chances', and the absolute accuracy with which his instructions were fulfilled was simply the logical result of his care.
When he refused to ease down his pace and bleated about freedom of contract, independent Americanism, and the dignity of toil, they proceeded to spoil his pace-making ability.
He exaggerated the Americanisms which he knew always made the Englishmen laugh and poured out a breathless stream of conversation, whimsical, high-spirited, and jolly.
Well, I should say so," agreed the young lady, who rather affected Americanisms.
Clear 'em out and let in some new blood, and keep out Americanism.
s narrative of the second relationship introduces with McSorley a figure who generally does not figure in studies of Modernism, making a case that his Sacrament of Duty (1909) represents a principled response to issues raised by both Americanism and Modernism.
2 million wartime veterans, The American Legion was founded in 1919 on the four pillars of a strong national security, veterans affairs, Americanism, and youth programs.
He was a top-priced 5-1 shot in the Pricewise table and he got the rain that suits, but still touched 15 on the machine Punting low I'd forgotten the drawn-out agony of a bad-travelling jumps bet Favourite Americanism "Loop and swoop" - description of Zenyatta's trademark hold-up round-the-field ride Favourite Francomeism A bad-jumping Bakbenscher was described as a "complete mutton head"
WHAT one generation of British English speakers objects to as an ugly Americanism often becomes so accepted here that later generations will use it without a second thought - even while objecting to Americanisms.
When I recently attended the annual Hill Cumorah Pageant put on by the Mormons in Palmyra, New York, I noted how cleverly they used Americanism to make their bizarre religious ideas more palatable to non-Mormons.
A variety of groups helped construct the meanings of Americanism during and after World War I.