Amitabha

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Amitabha

(ˌamiˈtɑbə)
n
(Buddhism) Buddhism (in Pure Land sects) a Bodhisattva who presides over a Pure Land in the west of the universe. Japanese name: Amida
[Sanskrit, literally: immeasurable light, from amita infinite + ābhā light]
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Extending from the foundational texts and first interpreters in the 4th century, to Rennyo in the 15th century, Professor Bloom's selections trace the development of Shin Buddhist teaching from monastic visualization practices to the widely popular path to salvation through faith in, and recitation of, the name of Amida Buddha.
The chapter refers to the book to supply the missing connections; key terms and names introduced in this chapter include karmic affinity, nembutsu, butsudan, Shinran, Amida Buddha, mappo, andjiriki/tariki.
With methods developed in the construction of the largest bronze statue in the world, the Ushiku Amida Buddha in Japan, Jarvie and his team will use modern technology, digital enlargement, and CNC manufacturing to minimize costs and manpower.
Each is adorned with statues representing a seated Amida Buddha, surrounded by other standing bodhisattva: Kannon and Seishi, six Jizo and two Niten (though one Niten is missing).
Therefore, in his view, manas-vjana means the MMNMP, and the great compassionate vow of Amida Buddha, the so-called Other Power that breaks the MMNMP and cultivates the Buddha nature in alaya.
Germany) presents this publication covering Buddhist meditation, specifically the practice of calling on the name of Amida Buddha, a practice which has become a core element to Buddhist meditation and spirituality.
Higashibaba notes that the concept of one supreme divinity was already familiar to the Japanese in the existence of Amida Buddha of Pure Land.
Shinran was the first to systematically teach the Teachings of Salvation through the grace of Amida Buddha.
Some of you may be aware that when I was a young boy, my mother brought me to Kamakura, where I looked up at that centuries-old symbol of peace and tranquility -- the great bronze Amida Buddha.
2) According to the books of Deathbed Manners (4) that describe the ideal manners at the time of death, a dying person should be aware of his or her approaching death, renounce his or her preoccupations with life, and practice the necessary rituals for transitioning into nirvana (eg, reciting Amida Buddha, meditating on Amitabha Buddha, or having faith in nirvana).
Is Amida Buddha a divine manifestation in whom one might actually take refuge?
leads the reader through a dazzling survey that traverses numerous traditions: the cult of the Amida Buddha in Japan, and the cult of Hindu goddesses compared with devotion to the Virgin Mary; the theology sung by the congregation in the hymnal of Scotland's Reformed Church; Martin Luther's sense of divine hiddenness and revelation; Jonathan and Sarah Edwards's experience of divine majesty and grace; ideas of God in rabbinic Judaism and Muslim monotheism (where some polarities are clearly downplayed, while others persist).