Amidah


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Amidah

(amiˈdaː; aˈmidə)
n
(Judaism) Judaism the central prayer in each of the daily services, recited silently and standing. Also called: Shemona Esrei
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For example, certain morning prayers cannot take place until after sunrise, such as putting on tefillin and the silent Amidah, or Shemona Esrei.
At this point in the Amidah, I'll allow you a few private moments of contemplative prayer.
The Rabbis were fully aware of the breadth and complexity of the term da 'at as can be seen in the text of the blessing for da'at in the daily amidah prayer.
Among the phenomena he chose for special mention and extended description in the Star are the full prostration of all the congregants during the Alenu prayer (uniquely placed within the Amidah of Musaf for both Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur), the sounding of the shofar and the appearance of the congregants in white robes (the kittel).
The Kedushah, or third blessing of the Amidah, the Shabbat's central prayer, concludes with "Hallelujah" spoken by the entire congregation.
Irving Berlin's "God Bless America" has moments when it sounds like the beginning of the Amidah, the standing prayer in Jewish service.
God of Me: Imagining God throughout Your Lifetime" discusses how the search for God is a lifetime endeavor, as Rabbi David Lyon speaks plainly and clearly on how in Jewish worship, it all starts with the central prayer of Amidah, urging readers to clear their mind of what they think God should be and search deeper for a clearer picture.
For example, the eleventh blessing in the Amidah reads: "Return O God our judges as of old, and our counselors as in days gone by, and acquit us injustice.
In "A Qumran Fragment and the Second Blessing of the Amidah" (1994/95), Flusser argues that a common source lies behind 4Q521 fragments 2+4 column 2 and the Gevurot, the second blessing of the Amidah.
The Amidah can be found in various English translations.
Thus, the prayer that Jews recite three times each day, the Amidah, ends with an entreaty to God for peace.
Although using different liturgical means, most liberal prayer-books add the names of the matriarchs of the Jewish people (Sarah, Rebecca, Leah and Rachel) to those of the Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac and Jacob), in the first blessing of the Amidah, also known as the "Eighteen Benediction Prayer", the central piece of the every service, traditionally recited three times a day.