ampliative


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ampliative

(ˈæmplɪətɪv)
adj
serving to extend or add to what is already known
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, he seems to overlook other anticipations of Kant, such as Hume's consideration of whether a statement about a straight line is, in effect, explicative or ampliative (Hume 37); and Hume's reference to the idea of the 'self or person' as 'that to which our several impressions and ideas are suppos'd to have a reference' (Hume 164).
2, "whatever be their origin or logical form, there is a distinction in judgements as to their content, according to which they are merely explicative, adding nothing to the content of the cognition, or ampliative, increasing the given cognition: the former may be called analytic, the latter synthetic, judgement.
Norman Kemp Smith (London: Macmillan, 1929) 51: "Upon such synthetic, that is, ampliative principles, all our a priori speculative knowledge must ultimately rest .
This Breazeale calls the 'phenomenological-synthetic' method, thus denoting both its performative and its ampliative nature.