ampliative


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ampliative

(ˈæmplɪətɪv)
adj
serving to extend or add to what is already known
References in periodicals archive ?
We only need to confirm some of its concrete consequences because ampliative inference is considered to be legitimate in the debate between inferentialists and realists.
4 mm lesion in the suprasellar region with an unclear contour and an ampliative third ventricle which was caused by the tumor compression and invasion [Figure 1]b,[Figure 1]c,[Figure 1]d,[Figure 1]e.
In natural language, argumentation normally rests on ampliative arguments, that is, arguments the conclusions of which go beyond the premises and are therefore more or less probable or plausible, lacking deductive certainty (Bohman y Rehg, 2014).
The principal deductivist insight here is that since ampliative (that is, inductive) inferences are invalid, their conclusions are no better supported than unsupported guesses, obtusely resistant to justification but, it is to be hoped, acutely susceptible to refutation.
The principles of biomedical ethics are by nature ampliative reasoning tools for arriving at conclusions and as such, they have their content-increasing capacities embeddedness within culture.
On the other hand, he seems to overlook other anticipations of Kant, such as Hume's consideration of whether a statement about a straight line is, in effect, explicative or ampliative (Hume 37); and Hume's reference to the idea of the 'self or person' as 'that to which our several impressions and ideas are suppos'd to have a reference' (Hume 164).
He used the terms ampliative and explicative to differentiate between the modes of reasoning that aim not only at plainly increasing the background knowledge but, by contrast, at making hidden or implicit knowledge explicit, at making manifest what is as yet latent and "located" at the level of pre-conceptual unconscious "contents".
It is commonly held in the philosophy of science that deduction is a non ampliative inference and therefore it is only a structure for searching order and good arguments.
2, "whatever be their origin or logical form, there is a distinction in judgements as to their content, according to which they are merely explicative, adding nothing to the content of the cognition, or ampliative, increasing the given cognition: the former may be called analytic, the latter synthetic, judgement.
The reason, according to Potter, is that "[i]t became apparent to Frege that polyadic logic is ampliative in Kant's sense" (64), and Kant insists that ampliative reasoning depends on objects that the judgments involved in the reasoning are about, and so must also depend on intuition.
While the comparative judgment is indeed a 'weighing (in the light of) the evidence', the extra step--let us call it the ampliative step--is not.