amulet

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amulet
stylized, palm-shaped amulet of the Middle East, used to protect against the evil eye

am·u·let

(ăm′yə-lĭt)
n.
An object worn, especially around the neck, as a charm against evil or injury.

[Latin amulētum, something protecting against illness, amulet, perhaps originally meaning "medicinal or magical preparation containing starch" and from amulum, amylum, starch; see amylum + -ētum, noun suffix.]

amulet

(ˈæmjʊlɪt)
n
(Jewellery) a trinket or piece of jewellery worn as a protection against evil; charm
[C17: from Latin amulētum, of unknown origin]

am•u•let

(ˈæm yə lɪt)

n.
a charm worn to ward off evil or to bring good fortune; talisman.
[1595–1605; (< Middle French amulete) < Latin amulētum]

amulet

A charm with magic power, made from a substance that protects against evil, such as wood, stone or metal and inscribed with magical characters or figures. They may be used to invoke the help of spirits and divert evil from the wearer but do not necessarily attract luck to the wearer or endow them with magical qualities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amulet - a trinket or piece of jewelry usually hung about the neck and thought to be a magical protection against evil or diseaseamulet - a trinket or piece of jewelry usually hung about the neck and thought to be a magical protection against evil or disease
good luck charm, charm - something believed to bring good luck
greegree, gres-gris, grigri - an African amulet

amulet

noun charm, fetish, talisman, juju, periapt (rare) He brought forth a small gold amulet.

amulet

noun
A small object worn or kept for its supposed magical power:
Translations
amuletti
amulet

amulet

[ˈæmjʊlɪt] Namuleto m

amulet

[ˈæmjʊlət] n (= charm, talisman) → amulette f

amulet

nAmulett nt
References in classic literature ?
These recognitions alone dispense with the artificial aid of tokens or amulets.
Like most savages they are firm believers in dreams, and in the power and efficacy of charms and amulets, or medicines as they term them.
These idols are hung round with amulets and votive offerings, such as beavers' teeth, and bears' and eagles' claws.
This gracious English maiden, with her clinging robes, her amulets and girdles, with something quaint and angular in her step, her carriage something mediaeval and Gothic, in the details of her person and dress, this lovely Evelyn Vane (isn't it a beautiful name?
I would have stopped him, but his blow took effect and broke the bracelet of amulets which encircled the arm of the savage.
The balance of the day and evening was filled with preparation for a great hunt--spears were overhauled, quivers were replenished, bows were restrung; and all the while the village witch doctor passed through the busy throngs disposing of various charms and amulets designed to protect the possessor from hurt, or bring him good fortune in the morrow's hunt.
And there beyond I see the red and silver of the Worsleys of Apuldercombe, who like myself are of Hampshire lineage, Close behind us is the moline cross of the gallant William Molyneux, and beside it the bloody chevrons of the Norfork Woodhouses, with the amulets of the Musgraves of Westmoreland.
She was stript of all her ornaments, lest perchance there should be among them some of those amulets which Satan was supposed to bestow upon his victims, to deprive them of the power of confession even when under the torture.
they hold a treasure Divine -- a talisman -- an amulet That must be worn at heart.
She laid one finger on her mouth and concealed the amulet in her bosom.
Either to a Power indefinable, incomprehensible, which I not only cannot address but which I cannot even express in words- the Great All or Nothing-" said he to himself, "or to that God who has been sewn into this amulet by Mary
The whitewashed walls; the little pews where well-known figures entered with a subdued rustling, and where first one well-known voice and then another, pitched in a peculiar key of petition, uttered phrases at once occult and familiar, like the amulet worn on the heart; the pulpit where the minister delivered unquestioned doctrine, and swayed to and fro, and handled the book in a long accustomed manner; the very pauses between the couplets of the hymn, as it was given out, and the recurrent swell of voices in song: these things had been the channel of divine influences to Marner--they were the fostering home of his religious emotions--they were Christianity and God's kingdom upon earth.