amylase

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Related to Amylases: Lipases, pectinases, Proteases, Cellulases

am·y·lase

 (ăm′ə-lās′, -lāz′)
n.
Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to sugars. In humans, amylases are produced in the salivary glands and the pancreas.

amylase

(ˈæmɪˌleɪz)
n
(Biochemistry) any of several enzymes that hydrolyse starch and glycogen to simple sugars, such as glucose. They are present in saliva

am•yl•ase

(ˈæm əˌleɪs, -ˌleɪz)

n.
any of several digestive enzymes that break down starches.
[1890–95]

am·y·lase

(ăm′ə-lās′)
Any of various enzymes that break down starches into their component sugars, such as glucose. Amylase is present in fluid secreted by the pancreas, in saliva in some mammals, and in plants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amylase - any of a group of proteins found in saliva and pancreatic juice and parts of plantsamylase - any of a group of proteins found in saliva and pancreatic juice and parts of plants; help convert starch to sugar
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
ptyalin - an amylase secreted in saliva
Translations
amyláza
amylase
Amylase
amelazo
amülaas
amylaasi
amylase
עמילאז
アミラーゼ
amylase
amylase
amylaza
amylas
амілаза

amylase

[ˈæmɪˌleɪz] namilasi f

amylase

n amilasa
References in periodicals archive ?
Amylases are ubiquitous enzymes found in prokaryotes, plants, animals, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes (Zaferanloo, Bhattacharjee, Ghorbani, Mahon, & Palombo, 2014).
These isolates were declared as safe and could be used for mass production of amylases to meet commercial demands.
2011) Production of alpha amylases by Aspergillus niger using cheaper substrates employing solid state fermentation.
Even though its extensive applications in industries, amylases obtained from mesophilic organisms failed to cope up with the industrial processes that are carried out in the presence of salt solutions, organic solvents, heavy metals, high temperature and extremes of pH that would be inhibit the enzymatic activity (Saxena et al.
Amylases constitute a class of industrial enzymes having approximately 25% of the enzyme market (Das et al.
Amylases can be obtained from several sources (Van der Maarel et al.
Amylases are one of the most widely used commercial enzymes whose range of application has broadened in numerous areas such as food, medicinal, clinical and analytical chemistry.
Amylases are enzymes that catalyses the breakdown of starch into sugars.
Amylases are among the major enzymes having highest significance in biotechnology.